Board of Visitors:

Rector & Member Archives

  • Rectors

    Governor Gilbert C. Walker appointed the first board of visitors (BOV) on March 19, 1872, the same day he signed the bill establishing the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College. The board, comprised of 10 members, held its first meeting in Richmond the following March 25-26, 1872. In 1873, the legislature instituted staggered terms for board members

     

    The composition of the board has changed from time to time over the years. When the board was first appointed in 1872, Gov. Gilbert C. Walker stipulated that ex officio members would include the president of the Virginia State Agricultural Society, members of the State Board of Education, and him. Today, the president of the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services is the only ex officio member. In 1982 the General Assembly approved the appointment of students to governing bodies of state colleges and universities, and in 1983 the first non-voting undergraduate student, James E. Stroh, joined the Virginia Tech board. The BOV began allowing the president of Faculty Senate to sit with the board in open sessions in 1988, with Joanne D. Eustis the first to fill that capacity. In 1995 the first graduate student, Dan W. Waddill, joined the board as a non-voting member. In 2006 the board amended its by-laws to add the president of the Staff Senate as a member, and Jean Brickey became the first classified staff representative. Like the undergraduate and graduate student representatives, faculty and staff representatives have no voting privileges.

     

    The chair of the board of visitors is called the rector. Rectors have been as follows (click on a name to read a brief bio of each person):

    • 1872-75 Dr. Harvey Black

      Harvey Black served on the board of visitors from 1872 to 1876 and was rector from 1872 to 1875.

       

      Black served as one of Lt. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's surgeons, and participated in the amputation of the general's arm following the battle of Chancellorsville. Following the war, Black, served as president of the board of trustees of the Preston and Olin Institute and was among those influencing the decision to locate the new land grant institution that would become Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.

       

      The first board of visitors of the fledgling institution was named by Gov. Gilbert Walker in 1872, taking office immediately. Among the members of the board were Black, who became the first Rector of the board; Joseph R. Anderson; William A. Stuart of Smythe and Wythe counties; John Penn of Patrick County; William T. Sutherlin, a native of Danville; Joseph Cloyd of Pulaski County; and Lewis E. Harvie, of Amelia County.

       

      (From "Confederates in the Collegium: The Influence of J.E.B. Stuart's Leadership on the Development of Virginia Tech")

    • 1875-77 Gen. G. C. Wharton

      Gen. Gabriel C. Wharton served on the board of visitors from 1874 to 1877 and was rector from 1875 to 1877.

       

      Wharton was born July 23, 1824 in Culpepper County, Va., the son of John Redd Wharton and Eliza Hansbrough Colvin Wharton. He enrolled at VMI on Sept. 1, 1845; was graduated July 5, 1847, standing second in a class of 12 (distinguished graduate). During the Civil War, he commanded the 51st Virginia Infantry (1861) and after promotion to brigadier general in 1863, was a division commander in the second corps of the Army of Northern Virginia.

       

      He married Ann Rebecca "Nannie" Radford, a daughter of Dr. John B. Radford (after whose family the city of Radford, Va., is named) and Elizabeth Radford. He was involved in the development of the New River Railroad, Mining, and Manufacturing Co., which was attempting to build a railroad line from Radford to the coal fields of southern West Virginia. In 1871, he was elected to the Legislature and served several terms in the General Assembly. He died May 12, 1906, in Radford.

    • 1877-80 William Eggleston

      William Eggleston served on the board of visitors from 1876 to 1879 and was rector from 1877 to 1880.

       

      At the start of the Civil War, the 24th Virginia Infantry Regiment was assembled in June 1861 with men from Floyd, Franklin, Carroll, Giles, Pulaski, Mercer, and Henry counties. Giles County contributed the New River Rifles to the 24th Virginia as Company F, and Eggleston was elected captain.

       

      Eggleston was elected in 1861 to the House of Delegates and served through 1863.

       

      After the war, he returned to Giles County and moved to Chapman's resort at the Palisades on the New River. In 1867, Eggleston took over and changed the name to Eggleston Springs.

       

      Eggleston looked to improve transportation in the region. In July 1870, the Virginia General Assembly incorporated the New River White Sulphur Springs Turnpike Company and granted it authority sell stock. Once enough funds were raised, the company was authorized to construct a road from the New River railroad bridge on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad (now Norfolk Southern's crossing at Radford) to White Sulphur Springs in Giles County.

       

      Eggleston was involved with his fellow board member, Gen. Gabriel C. Wharton, and other prominent New River Valley residents in the development of The New River Railroad, Mining, and Manufacturing Company, which was attempting to build a railroad line from Radford to the coal fields of southern West Virginia, when it obtained a charter in March of 1872.

    • 1880-81 R. P. Carson

      Robert P. Carson served on the board of visitors from 1880 to 1881 and was rector from 1880 to 1881.

       

      Carson was born to Joseph and Jane Carson on July 10, 1832, in Washington County, Va. In 1849, he went to the Abingdon Male Academy, then in 1851, he went to Virginia Military Institute and was graduated in 1854.

       

      In 1861, Carson, the a captain, headed the Glade Springs Rifles in Washington County. When the 37th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment was organized there in May 1861, Carson was named a lieutenant colonel in the regiment.

       

      Following the war, from 1865 to 1871, he was the principal of the Abingdon Academy. He went on to become the superintent of schools for Washington County. He died in 1924.

    • 1882-86 James C. Taylor

      James C. Taylor served on the board of visitors in 1872 as an ex-officio member and from 1881 to 1886 and was rector from 1882 to 1886.

       

      Taylor, from Christiansburg, was the attorney general for the commonwealth, and as such was a member of the State Board of Education, all of whom were to serve as ex officio members of the initial board of visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College.

       

      Taylor, born in Christiansburg, Va., on Sept. 23, 1826, was the son of Creed Taylor and Mary Craig, who was a daughter of early and prominent settlers in Montgomery County. In Christiansburg on Dec. 24, 1851, he married Kate R. Wade, daughter of William and Rebecca (Crow) Wade.

       

      Taylor served his country in two wars. He was a captain in the state militia, under Govs. Letcher and Wise, and was one of Montgomery County’s volunteers in the Mexican war, as was his brother George. Their company was commanded by Capt. James F. Preston, and the regiment served in Mexico under Gen. Zachary Taylor. Taylor was one of five brothers to enter the service in the Civil War: George, John, Creed, and Robert served with him. He was a captain, then major in the 54th Virginia Infantry.

       

      After the war, Taylor read law with Preston & Staples and was admitted to the bar in October 1850. He practiced in the state courts from the justice of the peace to the supreme court of appeals and in the national courts from district court to the supreme court of the United States. He was a member of the Virginia senate from 1863 to 1865; was attorney general from1869 to 1874; and was member of the house of delegates from 1881 to 1883.

       

      He died in 1887 and is buried in Christiansburg.

    • 1886-87 Waller R. Staples

      Waller Redd Staples served on the board of visitors from 1886 to 1888 and was rector from 1886 to 1887. He was appointed to the board by Gov. Fitzhugh Lee on Jan. 1, 1886, and elected rector by the board on Jan. 23, 1886.

       

      Staples of Christiansburg was a judge on the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

       

      He was born in Patrick County on Feb. 24, 1826. He studied at the University of North Carolina for two years, then entered the College of William and Mary, graduating in 1845. He moved to Montgomery County, Va., where he began the practice of law in the office of the Hon. William Ballard Preston. In 1853-54, he was a member of the state legislature. He was one of the four delegates sent by the Virginia convention of 1861 to represent the state in the Confederate provisional congress at Montgomery, Ala., until Feb. 22, 1862. On that day, the new Confederate congress came into existence, and Staples became a member of its house of representatives. He was re-elected in 1863 and served until the end of the war. He returned to his law practice in Montgomery County.

       

      In February 1870, he was elected to the Supreme Court of Appeals, serving until 1882 when the Readjuster party came into control of the state. Staples and his associates on the bench were not re-elected. In 1884, Staples was a member of the committee chosen to revise the civil and criminal laws of the state, resulting in the "Code of Virginia of 1887."

       

      He served as president of the Virginia Bar Association from 1893 to 1894.

       

      He died Aug. 20, 1897, in Christiansburg and is buried in Fair View Cemetery in Roanoke.

    • 1887-89 J. Hoge Tyler

      James Hoge Tyler served on the board of visitors from 1887 to 1890 and was rector from 1887 to 1889.

       

      Tyler, Virginia governor from 1898 to 1902, was born at the Tyler family farm, called Blenheim, in Caroline County, Va., on Aug. 11, 1846. He was the son of George Tyler (1817-1889), who was a representative of Caroline County, and Eliza Hoge (1815-1846), the daughter of Gen. James Hoge. His mother having died during his birth, the young Tyler was reared by his grandparents, James and Eleanor Howe Hoge at Hayfield, their Pulaski County, Va., home. Tyler was educated in Pulaski County before attending the school of Franklin Minor in Albermarle County, Va.

       

      Tyler left school at the age of 16 to join the Confederate army and served as a private in the Signal Corps throughout the Civil War. (His later rank of "major" was apparently a post-war honorific.) After the war, Tyler returned to Pulaski County, where he had inherited the Hoge farm. He would rename the farm Belle Hampton and become a successful farmer, raising Durham cattle and serving as president of the Virginia Stock Farmers' Institute and of the Southwest Virginia Live Stock Association. His other business interests would come to include a store, a gristmill, a sawmill, the Belle Hampton Coal Mining Co. (sold in 1902 to a New York company), and the Radford Development Co.

       

      Tyler married Sue Montgomery Hammet (daughter of Edward and Clementina Craig Hammet, who built the first home in what it now Radford, Va.) on Nov. 16, 1868. While living at Belle Hampton, the Tylers had eight children: Edward H., James H. Jr., Stockton H., Lucy Belle, Sue H., Henry C. "Hal," Eliza "Lily," and Eleanor Howe, who died in infancy. In 1891, the family moved to Halwick, their home in Radford.

       

      In 1877, Tyler was elected to the state senate, serving one term and advocating retrenchment and reform. He maintained an active role in civic affairs, serving on the state debt commission. He served on the board of visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College from 1887 to 1890 and served as rector from 1887 to 1889.

       

      During the 1880s, he mounted two unsuccessful congressional campaigns. Tyler also launched an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1889 but secured the second place on the Democratic ticket that year and served as lieutenant governor from 1890 to 1894. While serving as lieutenant governor, Tyler again ran for the governorship in 1893, losing to Charles T. O'Ferrall. In 1897, Tyler successfully campaigned for governor and served from 1898 to 1902.

       

      Tyler's gubernatorial administration was marked by a concern with adjustment of Virginia's state debt. He was a strong supporter of bi-metallism, and was a personal friend of William Jennings Bryan. The American Historical Society's History of Virginia (1926) summarized Tyler's governorship thus: "Governor Tyler's administration was marked by the settlement of the long vexed oyster question, for it was largely through his efforts that the LeCato bill was made effective and the oyster beds of the state made to yield an income to the state instead of an annual deficit. As governor he secured the reduction of taxes and the state debt and the increase of the public school fund and the literary fund. Other measures credited to his administration are the establishment of the Farm Bureau, the reorganization of the agricultural department, a conditional pardon system and the settlement of the Virginia-Tennessee boundary question."

       

      While serving as governor, Tyler launched an unsuccessful campaign for the U. S. Senate seat of incumbent Thomas S. Martin. His unsuccessful 1899 campaign would be Tyler's last, though he would continue to be somewhat active in state politics, playing the role of elder statesman and considering various pleas that he again seek office. During World War I, he served as food administrator for Radford and Montgomery County.

       

      James Hoge Tyler died Jan. 3, 1925. Sue Hammet Tyler, born July 16, 1845, died April 24, 1927.

    • 1889-1900 Charles E. Vawter

      Charles E. Vawter served on the board of visitors from 1886 to 1900 and was rector from 1989 to 1900.

       

      Charles Erastus Vawter was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, June 9, 1841. He was the son of John H. Vawter, who was, for twenty-four years, a member or the Virginia legislature. Charles Vawter's education at Emory and Henr College was interrupted in his junior year, when he joined the Confederate army, serving in the Stonewall Brigade, in which he became a captain. He was ceptured and became a prisoner or war at Fort Delaware. He was graduated from Emory and Henry in 1866, and, in that year, married Virginia Longley. For twelve years, he was professor of mathematics at his alma mater. He served as a member of the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute, and was recognised as an authority on manual training in the south. He died in 1905.

       

      When Albemarle County received more then a million dollere from the bequest of Samuel Miller, its commissioners started a search for an industrial school, after which to pattern the one to be set up in Albemarle from the Miller Fund. No such institution could be found; so, the commissioners had to undertake an experiment without a model; to set up an example, instead of following one. A contract was entered into for the construction of the buildings, and then the commissioners began their search for a superintendent. After two days of weighting the qualifications of the various applicants, Charles E. Vawter was elected as the first superintendent of the Miller Manual Labor School. The Miller School, an institution for orphan boys and girls, established on a farm, with buildings and shops especially erected and equipped, offered him a rare opportunity to realise his ideal of a school that would train the mlnd and hand together. How well he succeeded is indicated by the fact that, in 1886, the Governor of Virginia asked him to give to the Commonwealth of Virginia the benefit of his experiences in the reorganization of the college at Blacksburg, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. On the advice of friends, and with the consent of the Miller School authorities, he accepted the offered position, and, for the next fourteen years, he devoted much labor and thought to the development of this great interest of the State. How well Captain Vawter served as a member of the Board of Visitors during the turbulent years (1886-1891), and as Rector of the Board during the golden era of the real beginning of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, may best be learned from his contemporaries:

       

      "Dr. McBryde, on the occasion of Captaln Vawter's retiring from the post of Rector: 'It would be difficult to give adequate expression to our appreciation of the valuable services you have rendered the institution and the State by your wise and able administration of the important affairs falling within the province of the board of Visitors . . Your thorough knowledge of everything pertaining to sound technical training and your uniform courtesy in the discharge of the duties attaching to the Rectorshlp have long commanded our admiration' ". (From the Bugle, vol. 6, 1900; dedicated to Captain Vawter. See pages 4-10)

       

      " . . He had great influence in promoting the development of industrial education in the public schools throughout the country. He was a member of the State Board of Education and rendered valuable service in organising the public schools of Virginia under the constitution of 1902; he served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Normal and Industrial School for girls at Farmville, Virginia, which became a State Teachers' College; he was also Chairman of the Board of the Normal and Industrial Institute for Negroes at Petersburg; and of the State Board of Charities and Corrections. For a number of years, he was Rector of the Board of Trustees of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and aided President J. B. McBryde in shaping the policies of that institution . . ." (From artlcle by C. W. Dabney in the Dictionary of American Biography, v. 19, p. 260)

       

      " . . . Captain Vawter's memorial is not dependent upon marble shaft nor brazen tablet. It is written in men's lives - lives that will perpetuate the good seed sown in the early days when manual training was not given its true measure of worth. The life of this educator shows to every energetic young man that great things not only may, but can, be accomplished, when mentel ability is accompanied by the energy to will and to do . . . " (From article Charles E. Vawter, June 19, 1841 - October 27, 1905, in Grey Jacket, ser. 3, v. 14, p. 96-98, November 1905)

      On his death, in 1905, he was lamented as "a man of astonishing simplicity and modesty"; as one who combined soldierly qualities with rare gentleness; as a humaitarian devoted to education and to human welfare, particularly among the poverty-stricken and the Negro race. Especially pertinent to his being honored by Virginia Agricultural end Mechanical College, was his profound influence on the strengthening of this institution by helping Dr. J. B. McBryde and by aiding him powerfully in improving and establishing policies which have made the Virginia Polytechnic Institute of today a reality.

       

      From the report of the committee established to consider names of certain buildings on campus, sent to Dr. Walter S. Newman, President, on April 26, 1962.

    • 1900-08 J. Thompson Brown

      John Thompson Brown served on the board of visitors from 1889 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921 and was rector from 1900 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921.

       

      By Professor H. S. Worthington, Sweet Briar College

       

      The Honorable John Thompson Brown needs no introduction to the alumni and friends of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Ever since his first appointment to its board of visitors, in March, 1890, by Governor McKinney, he has been recognized on all sides as one of the ablest administrators that the Institute has ever had. The Virginia Polytechnic Institute has been for him not only a very real and constant interest and an unselfish devotion, but an ideal and a passion. The results of this, as shown in the services that Mr. Brown has rendered the institution, are also well known. Indeed, they are already recorded, both in the history of the V. P. I. and in the records of educational advance in Virginia. Therefore, when the editors of the BULLETIN present in this issue a sketch of Mr. Brown's career, they do so realizing that the sketch will be but a repetition of facts already familiar to its readers, but confident also that these facts, relating as they do to a tried and loyal friend, will be received with pleasure&emthat inexpressibly keen pleasure peculiar to the renewal of old friendships, interrupted perhaps by the busy interests of practical life, but none the less living and cherished.

       

      John Thompson Brown was born at "Stanley," near Old Church, Hanover County, February 19th, 1861. He is the only child of Anne Frances Bland (Coalter) and Henry Peronneau Brown, who lived at the family home of the latter, "Ivy Cliff," in Bedford County. Several of his ancestors were men well known in Virginia's history. Among these might be mentioned, on his mother's side, John Coalter, of Augusta County, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, and John Randolph, of Roanoke, who was a half-brother of his maternal great grandmother. On the paternal side were Samuel Brown, of Rockbridge, a distinguished Presbyterian divine, and his grandfather, John Thompson Brown, who, after a brilliant career at Princeton, was a prominent representative of Petersburg in the General Assembly of Virginia.

       

      Mr. Brown's childhood and early youth were spent at his father's home in Bedford. He was educated at McCabe's School and at the University of Virginia. In both of these institutions he was prominent in athletics and very popular among his fellow students. He left the University without taking a degree, married Miss Cassie Dallas Tucker, of Richmond, and took up farming on the family estate in Bedford.

       

      Intensely interested in the advancement of agriculture, he soon became a member of the executive committee of the Farmers' Assembly, the forerunner of the Farmers' Alliance. In this capacity he urged the importance of putting the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, into the hands of practical farmers and mechanics to the end that it might be made a vital and effective force in the development of Virginia's resources. In March, 1890, he was appointed to the board of visitors of the college. He served as a visitor continuously until 1896. In 1891-1892 he represented Bedford County in the Legislature, and in 1892 he was an elector for the Sixth Congressional District on the Cleveland ticket. He was reappointed in 1898 to the V. P. I. board of visitors, and was elected its rector when the late Captain C. E. Vawter resigned.

       

      Writing May 3d, 1901, Captain Vawter spoke of his successor. In the following terms: "Mr. John Thompson Brown was associated with me several years on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. There I learned to know him well and to appreciate his worth. I found him to be a man of sterling integrity, high character, and firmness of purpose. He is slow to come to a decision. He weighs carefully both sides of a question. But, when he decides what is right, he adheres to it, let the consequences be what they may. He acts from principle, not policy. As a State official, he is always true to his trust. While always generous, kind, and true to his friends, he never seeks the advancement of anyone at the expense of the State. He is a delightful social companion, a true friend, a faithful officer, and a Christian gentleman. The present prosperity of the college is largely due to his faithfulness and firmness."

       

      Some idea of the esteem in which Mr. Brown was held by the students of the institution he has served so well may be gained from the following dedication of the 1901 Bugle:

       

      "To the popular rector of our board of visitors,

      JOHN THOMPSON BROWN,

      genial and large-hearted in private life, a public-spirited and progressive

      citizen, an able legislator and wise counselor, the steadfast and

      devoted friend of our institution, this publication is

      dedicated as an evidence of our

      affectionate regard."

       

      It was during his terms of service as visitor and rector that the Virginia Polytechnic Institute made the rapid strides that have put it in the forefront of Virginia institutions of learning. Mr. Brown served as rector until July, 1908, when his term expired and Governor Swanson failed to reappoint him. While Dr. McBryde was absent on account of ill health in 1905-1906, the board of visitors elected Mr. Brown to act as president in his stead at a salary of two thousand dollars. He declined to accept remuneration as being inconsistent with his position, but consented to supervise the affairs of the college during the enforced absence of the president. When Dr. McBryde retired permanently, Mr. Brown's name was mentioned for the V. P. I. presidency. In addition to his activities in behalf of the college, Mr. Brown had been, in the meanwhile, instrumental in securing the creation, by the State Legislature, of the Crop Pest Commission, the Cattle Quarantine Commission, of which he was chairman for ten years, and the Virginia Truck Experiment Station, which he served as a member of the first board of governors. He had also represented Bedford County, together with the late Honorable John Goode, in the Constitutional Convention. Here he was an active member of several important committees, among them the committee on taxation and finance, and the committee on education. The able fight which he led both in the former committee and on the floor of the convention, in behalf of good roads, paved the way for State aid to road building. And, undoubtedly, much of the remarkable highway development of the past decade is due to the fact that the State of Virginia has both encouraged and aided the movement for good roads.

       

      Mr. Brown was a candidate in the Democratic primary of 1909 for the position of Commissioner of Agriculture of Virginia. He was defeated by Mr. Koiner by some eleven hundred votes out of a total of over sixty thousand votes cast. In 1912 he was reappointed to the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute by Governor Mann; and when, last June, the Honorable L. E. Johnson relinquished the duties of the rectorship, which he had so satisfactorily filled, it was but natural that the board should choose Mr. Brown as his successor.

       

      Mr. Brown is a strong man, physically, mentally, and morally. It is through these qualities that he has won recognition all over Virginia. Farmers, students, professional men, and State political leaders all trust and admire him. He is a man of wide culture, with all the breadth of interest that the phrase conveys; he is a constant and thoughtful reader; a lover of the country and of rural life; an unselfish devotee to principle first of all; a lover of home, a devoted husband and father; an active churchman; a Democrat with both a large and a small d; a progressive conservative; a loyal friend, generous, hospitable, modest, refined&emin short, a Virginia gentleman. And in these twentieth century days of narrow specialization, of pallid, homeless, childless, city flatdwellers, of self-seeking greed and graft, of presidential and ex-presidential vilification and vituperation, it is men&embut far too few, alas&emof the John Thompson Brown type that stand out in bold relief.

       

      From the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Catalog) 1912 (Vol. V, No. 4, October, 1912), pp. 25-29

    • 1908-10 J. C. Carrington

      John Cullen Carrington served on the board of visitors from 1901 to 1912 and was rector from 1908 to 1910.

       

      John Cullen Carrington was from Charlotte Court House, in Charlotte County, Va. He was a county commissioner and served on the County Councils of the Agricultural Council of Safety.

    • 1910-12 L. E. Johnson

      Lucius E. Johnson served on the board of visitors from 1908 to 1912 and was rector from 1910 to 1912.

       

      The following is from the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institue, Vol. I, No. 4, October, 1908, pp. 10-12.

       

      New Members Of The Board Of Visitors

      (Extract from Men of Mark of Virginia, Vol. I.)

       

      Lucius E Johnson Lucius E Johnson

       

      Lucius E. Johnson, railroad president, was born in Aurora, Illinois, April 13, 1846, and is the son of John Spencer and Eliza Johnson. His father was a blacksmith and veterinary surgeon, the typical "village blacksmith," honest, strong and upright. Mrs. Eliza Johnson was a noble Christian woman, intelligent, shrewd, practical, and exerted a strong influence over her son both intellectually and morally.

       

      Lucius Johnson was sent to the public free schools of his native town. There he acquired a "practical English education," as the phrase goes, and this has served him in good stead in his office work as a railroad manager and president. In boyhood and youth, Mr. Johnson was blessed with good health, due partly to playing and working and partly to the vigor of his parents. While at school, he spent some of his spare time reading history and books on mechanical subjects. He rested his mind at times by reading good novels. "Honest study, good playing, and fondness for work," he says, helps to account for his first successes.

       

      His first strong impulse in life was the necessity of earning a livelihood. After leaving the public school of Aurora, Ill., he entered the railroad service as a brakeman. Then he served as fireman and as a locomotive engineer. In these positions, he did his duty and did it every day, and, looking back over his successful life, he finds that the secret of his success is persistent devotion to his work, and he believes that this same persistence will generally bring success. For some years, Mr. Johnson was a master mechanic at Aurora, Ill. In 1886, he was made superintendent of the St. Louis division of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. In December, 1888, he returned to Aurora as superintendent of the Chicago division of the same road. In 1890, he was asked to take the superintendency of the Montana Central Railroad, with headquarters at Helena, Montana. In less than three years, he was made superintendent of the Michigan division of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, and in July, 1897, became general superintendent of the Norfolk and Western Railway. In two years, he was made vice-president and general manager of the whole Norfolk and Western system. On the 30th of September, 1903, Lucius E. Johnson was elected to the presidency of the Norfolk and Western Railway, a position which he is now filling with conspicuous ability.

       

      The newspapers of October 1, 1903, in announcing Mr. Johnson's election, used their largest headlines. "Started as Fireman," said one paper, in enormous type. If they had asked Mr. Johnson to solve the mystery, he might well have said, "There is no mystery, only natural law in the moral world;" persistent devotion to his duty day by day placed him in his high position.

       

      Commenting editorially, one of our dailies said: "A striking example of the opportunity afforded young men of ability, industry and determination, to rise in this country to the highest positions of trust and responsibility, is forcibly exhibited in the recent election of Mr. L. E. Johnson to be president of the Norfolk and Western Railway Corporation." Another paper said: "In the front rank of the high railroad officials of the world must be enrolled Mr. Lucius E. Johnson, the new president of the Norfolk and Western Railway. But a few years ago he wore the greasy overalls of a locomotive fireman of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad* * * * Mr. Johnson is amiable, just, unselfish and stern, and to these qualities, combined with his marvelous insight into human nature and his tremendous capacity for work without waste, has been due his constant advance in railroad circles."

       

      Mr. Johnson belongs to the Masonic order, and to social clubs in Cincinnati, Roanoke and Norfolk. In these, he takes relaxation from the strenuous duties of his office. Further pleasure he derives from baseball, dogs and horses.

       

      Mr. Johnson has patented a railway scoop-car and a signal lamp fixture, both of which are used by the railroads of the country. In political preference, Mr. Johnson is a Democrat, what was known as "Gold Democrat," which we may say to the young reader, means that he did not endorse the doctrine of "free silver at a ratio of 16 to 1," and did not favor the election of W. J. Bryan to the presidency.

       

      On April 10, 1869, Mr. Johnson married Miss Ella Parker. They have had five children, only two of whom are now living. He and his family reside at 204 Mountain Avenue, Roanoke, Virginia.

       

      Johnson retired from the railroad presidency and became chairman of the board of directors in the mid teens. He retired from that postion on January 1, 1921. He died at the age of 74 on February 9, 1921, in Deland, Florida, after a brief illness. His body was returned to Roanoke for funeral services, then transported to his former hometown of Aurora, Illinois, for burial. He was survied by his widow, two sons, George P. Johnson of Pittsburgh, Pa., and Edward M. Johnson of Roanoke.

       

    • 1912-21 J. Thompson Brown

      John Thompson Brown served on the board of visitors from 1889 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921 and was rector from 1900 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921.

       

      By Professor H. S. Worthington, Sweet Briar College

       

      The Honorable John Thompson Brown needs no introduction to the alumni and friends of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Ever since his first appointment to its board of visitors, in March, 1890, by Governor McKinney, he has been recognized on all sides as one of the ablest administrators that the Institute has ever had. The Virginia Polytechnic Institute has been for him not only a very real and constant interest and an unselfish devotion, but an ideal and a passion. The results of this, as shown in the services that Mr. Brown has rendered the institution, are also well known. Indeed, they are already recorded, both in the history of the V. P. I. and in the records of educational advance in Virginia. Therefore, when the editors of the BULLETIN present in this issue a sketch of Mr. Brown's career, they do so realizing that the sketch will be but a repetition of facts already familiar to its readers, but confident also that these facts, relating as they do to a tried and loyal friend, will be received with pleasure&emthat inexpressibly keen pleasure peculiar to the renewal of old friendships, interrupted perhaps by the busy interests of practical life, but none the less living and cherished.

       

      John Thompson Brown was born at "Stanley," near Old Church, Hanover County, February 19th, 1861. He is the only child of Anne Frances Bland (Coalter) and Henry Peronneau Brown, who lived at the family home of the latter, "Ivy Cliff," in Bedford County. Several of his ancestors were men well known in Virginia's history. Among these might be mentioned, on his mother's side, John Coalter, of Augusta County, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, and John Randolph, of Roanoke, who was a half-brother of his maternal great grandmother. On the paternal side were Samuel Brown, of Rockbridge, a distinguished Presbyterian divine, and his grandfather, John Thompson Brown, who, after a brilliant career at Princeton, was a prominent representative of Petersburg in the General Assembly of Virginia.

       

      Mr. Brown's childhood and early youth were spent at his father's home in Bedford. He was educated at McCabe's School and at the University of Virginia. In both of these institutions he was prominent in athletics and very popular among his fellow students. He left the University without taking a degree, married Miss Cassie Dallas Tucker, of Richmond, and took up farming on the family estate in Bedford.

       

      Intensely interested in the advancement of agriculture, he soon became a member of the executive committee of the Farmers' Assembly, the forerunner of the Farmers' Alliance. In this capacity he urged the importance of putting the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, into the hands of practical farmers and mechanics to the end that it might be made a vital and effective force in the development of Virginia's resources. In March, 1890, he was appointed to the board of visitors of the college. He served as a visitor continuously until 1896. In 1891-1892 he represented Bedford County in the Legislature, and in 1892 he was an elector for the Sixth Congressional District on the Cleveland ticket. He was reappointed in 1898 to the V. P. I. board of visitors, and was elected its rector when the late Captain C. E. Vawter resigned.

       

      Writing May 3d, 1901, Captain Vawter spoke of his successor. In the following terms: "Mr. John Thompson Brown was associated with me several years on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. There I learned to know him well and to appreciate his worth. I found him to be a man of sterling integrity, high character, and firmness of purpose. He is slow to come to a decision. He weighs carefully both sides of a question. But, when he decides what is right, he adheres to it, let the consequences be what they may. He acts from principle, not policy. As a State official, he is always true to his trust. While always generous, kind, and true to his friends, he never seeks the advancement of anyone at the expense of the State. He is a delightful social companion, a true friend, a faithful officer, and a Christian gentleman. The present prosperity of the college is largely due to his faithfulness and firmness."

       

      Some idea of the esteem in which Mr. Brown was held by the students of the institution he has served so well may be gained from the following dedication of the 1901 Bugle:

       

      "To the popular rector of our board of visitors,

      JOHN THOMPSON BROWN,

      genial and large-hearted in private life, a public-spirited and progressive

      citizen, an able legislator and wise counselor, the steadfast and

      devoted friend of our institution, this publication is

      dedicated as an evidence of our

      affectionate regard."

       

      It was during his terms of service as visitor and rector that the Virginia Polytechnic Institute made the rapid strides that have put it in the forefront of Virginia institutions of learning. Mr. Brown served as rector until July, 1908, when his term expired and Governor Swanson failed to reappoint him. While Dr. McBryde was absent on account of ill health in 1905-1906, the board of visitors elected Mr. Brown to act as president in his stead at a salary of two thousand dollars. He declined to accept remuneration as being inconsistent with his position, but consented to supervise the affairs of the college during the enforced absence of the president. When Dr. McBryde retired permanently, Mr. Brown's name was mentioned for the V. P. I. presidency. In addition to his activities in behalf of the college, Mr. Brown had been, in the meanwhile, instrumental in securing the creation, by the State Legislature, of the Crop Pest Commission, the Cattle Quarantine Commission, of which he was chairman for ten years, and the Virginia Truck Experiment Station, which he served as a member of the first board of governors. He had also represented Bedford County, together with the late Honorable John Goode, in the Constitutional Convention. Here he was an active member of several important committees, among them the committee on taxation and finance, and the committee on education. The able fight which he led both in the former committee and on the floor of the convention, in behalf of good roads, paved the way for State aid to road building. And, undoubtedly, much of the remarkable highway development of the past decade is due to the fact that the State of Virginia has both encouraged and aided the movement for good roads.

       

      Mr. Brown was a candidate in the Democratic primary of 1909 for the position of Commissioner of Agriculture of Virginia. He was defeated by Mr. Koiner by some eleven hundred votes out of a total of over sixty thousand votes cast. In 1912 he was reappointed to the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute by Governor Mann; and when, last June, the Honorable L. E. Johnson relinquished the duties of the rectorship, which he had so satisfactorily filled, it was but natural that the board should choose Mr. Brown as his successor.

       

      Mr. Brown is a strong man, physically, mentally, and morally. It is through these qualities that he has won recognition all over Virginia. Farmers, students, professional men, and State political leaders all trust and admire him. He is a man of wide culture, with all the breadth of interest that the phrase conveys; he is a constant and thoughtful reader; a lover of the country and of rural life; an unselfish devotee to principle first of all; a lover of home, a devoted husband and father; an active churchman; a Democrat with both a large and a small d; a progressive conservative; a loyal friend, generous, hospitable, modest, refined&emin short, a Virginia gentleman. And in these twentieth century days of narrow specialization, of pallid, homeless, childless, city flatdwellers, of self-seeking greed and graft, of presidential and ex-presidential vilification and vituperation, it is men&embut far too few, alas&emof the John Thompson Brown type that stand out in bold relief.

       

      From the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Catalog) 1912 (Vol. V, No. 4, October, 1912), pp. 25-29

       

    • 1921-26 J. B. Watkins

      John Benjamin Watkins served on the board of visitors from 1903 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1928 and was rector from 1921 to 1926.

       

      Watkins was born June 14, 1855, in Powhatan County, Va. He began Watkins Nursery in the Midlothian, Va., area with his brother in 1876. He also served on the board of Farmville State Teachers College (now Longwood University).

       

      Watkins was a Virginia state senator from 1908 to 1912 and from 1927 to 1931. He was elected to represent Chesterfield. He was also involved with the Virginia Agricultural Council of Safety, representing Chesterfield County and serving as chairman.

       

      He died Nov. 30, 1931 and is buried at Bethel Baptist Church in Midlothian.

       

      --------

       

      This sketch was by Professor Richard H. Hudnall, professor of English, and was printed in the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute -- The State Agricultural and Mechanical College, Vol. 5, No. 4, October 1912, pp. 31-32.

       

      J. B. Watkins was born on his father's farm in the lower end of Powhatan County, June 14th, 1855. After studying in the private schools near his home, he became in 1873 a student at Richmond College. Later he returned to his father's farm and with his father carried on agricultural work. Thirty or more years ago, he began the nursery business, growing at first only fruit trees; later, however, as the business developed, shade trees, ornamental shrubs and evergreens have been grown. The nursery has proved a very profitable enterprise and the business has greatly increased in the last few years.

       

      In 1879, Mr. Watkins was married to Miss Lelia N. Michaux, of Michaux, Powhatan County, Virginia. Of the ten children born to them, eight are still living. Two of the sons are graduates of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

       

      In the nineties Mr. Watkins was elected for a number of years president of the Virginia State Fair Association, of Richmond. He was elected also, in 1907, to the Senate of Virginia from the Sixteenth Senatorial District, served four years and was reelected in 1911. He was appointed by Governor Montague a member of the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and served six or seven years prior to 1908. He was then appointed by Governor Swanson on the board of the State Normal School at Farmville. In June, 1912, he was reappointed to the Virginia Polytechnic Institute board of visitors by Governor Mann. He is also president of the Chesterfield County Agricultural Association.

       

    • 1926-43 Robert S. Moss

      Robert S. Moss served on the board of visitors from 1918 to 1943 and was rector from 1926 to 1943.

       

      Moss was from Burkes Garden, Va. He was born in 1874 and died in 1943 at the age of 69. He was married to Caroline Dunn on Sept. 11, 1901. They had one son, Joseph S. Moss.

       

    • 1943-48 James P. Woods

      James Pleasant Woods served on the board of visitors from 1924 to 1948 and was rector from 1943 to 1948.

       

      James Pleasant Woods, was born near Roanoke, on February 4, 1868. He attended the common schools and was graduated from Roanoke College in 1892. He studied law at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1892 and 1893, and was admitted to the bar in the latter year and commenced practice in Roanoke. He served as mayor of Roanoke from 1898-1900.

       

      Woods was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-fifth (1917-1919) and Sixty-sixth (1919-1921) Congresses to fill the vacancies caused by the resignation of Carter Glass and was reelected to the Sixty-seventh (1921-1923) Congress. He served from February 25, 1919, to March 3, 1923. He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1922 and resumed the practice of law.

       

      Woods was president of the board of trustees of Roanoke College and a member of the board of trustees of the Randolph-Macon system of colleges. He served on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute from 1924 to 1948 and was rector from 1943 to 1948. He died in Roanoke on July 7, 1948, and is buried in Evergreen Burial Park.

       

      From the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

    • 1948-52 William E. Wine

      William E. Wine (Class of 1904), served on the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors from 1943 to 1954 and was rector from 1948 to 1952. He also served as president and member of the board of directors of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association.

       

      Wine was born in Bridgewater, Va. He entered Virginia Polytechnic Institute as a sophomore rat in September 1901. He was graduated in June 1904, with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. He was an assistant in the Virginia Tech Department of Graphics in 1904 and 1905 and received the degree of mechanical engineer in June 1905. He worked for the Atlantic Coast Line Railway as a draftsman then resident engineer before ending up as chief mechanical draftsman. During his time with the railroad, from 1906 to 1913, he designed and patented a number of parts for railroad cars and locomotives.

       

      The Wine Railway Appliance Co. was established in Toledo, Ohio, in July 1912 to manufacture some of the parts Wine had designed. Wine was elected president of the company in September 1913 and left the railroad to take that post, where he continued to design and patent additional parts. The Industrial Steel Casting Co. was organized with Wine's assistance in 1919 in Toledo to manufacture castings, sheet steel, steel wire, wire rope, pig iron, and structural steel products. He served as chairman of the board of directors and of the Executive Committee of this company.

       

      Wine devoted much of his time to his businesses, but he did make time to be active in the alumni association and his game farm in Virginia, where, with the co-operation of the state game department he raised the only pure breed of wild turkeys in captivity.

       

      Wine also was a trustee at Bridgewater College from 1951 to 1955. The William E. and Margaret K. Wine Endowed Scholarship Fund was set up there in 1982.

       

      The William E. Wine Award was established in his memory at Virginia Tech by the Alumni Fund Council in 1956. These awards, first presented in 1957, went to the most outstanding teacher in each school until 1962. Beginning that year, the award went to three faculty members elected at large from a selection nominated by students, faculty, and alumni.

       

      He died in 1956. His wife, Margaret, died in 1983.

       

    • 1952-56 Vernon G. Eberwine

      Vernon G. Eberwine was a member of the board of visitors from 1944 to 1956 and served as rector from 1952 to 1956.

       

      Eberwine was born Feb. 4, 1896, to John George And Annah Mildred Gaskins Eberwine. He graduated in 1912 from the Agricultural High School at Driver in Nansemond County, Va,m and attended Randolph Macon College at Ashland, Va. He transferred to and was graduated from Virginia Tech in 1917.

       

      He operated a cannery business in partnership with two brothers. He served for 30 years as chairman of the Nansemond County Board of Supervisors. He was also a member of the State Board of Agriculture and the Tidewater Virginia Development Council. He served on the board of directors of Louise Obici Hospital in Suffolk, Va.

       

      He was named first citizen of Suffolk and Nansemond County in 1961 by the Suffolk Rotary Club.

       

      He died Dec. 13, 1962, after suffering a heart attack Nov. 24.

       

    • 1956-62 Guy L. Furr

      Guy L. Furr served on the board of visitors from 1954 to 1962 and was rector from 1956 to 1962.

       

      Furr was born Jan. 19, 1895, in Bluemont in Loudoun County, Va. His parents were John William Thompson Furr and Mary Frances Frasier Furr.

       

      He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1916 with a degree in electrical engineering and went to work for Appalachian Power in Bluefield, W.Va. He served in a number of positions there until 1943, when he was named manager of the Bluefield Division. From there, he moved to Roanoke, Va., in 1946 as assistant general manager. On Nov. 1, 1952, he became vice president and general manager of the company, a position he held until he retired in January 1960. Furr continued as a vice president and consultant, working on the development of the Smith Mountain Lake hydroelectric project that was under way at that time.

       

      He married Sammye Ada Ferguson on Sept. 10, 1924. They had one daughter, Mary Catherine Furr, and a son, Guy Littleton Furr Jr.

       

      Furr was also involved in professional associations, the business community, and local organizations. He was a past president and director of Southeastern Electric Exchange, a trade association of electric utilities serving the southeastern states, as well as a past president of both the Bluefield and Roanoke chambers of commerce, a director of S.H. Heironimus (the Roanoke department store chain), and a director of the Blue Ridge Boy Scout Council.

       

      He died Feb. 15, 1977 in Roanoke.

       

      He received the Alumni Distinguished Service award from the university in 1973.

    • 1962-64 W. Thomas Rice

      W. Thomas Rice served on the board of visitors from 1961 to 1968 and was rector from 1962 to 1964.

       

      William Thomas Rice was born in 1913 in Hague, Va. In 1930, at the beginning of the Great Depression, an Episcopal minister recommended to Mrs. Alfred I. DuPont that she provide a college scholarship for a young man from rural Virginia. To prove to the minister and Mrs. DuPont that they were wise in their decision, Tom Rice graduated from Virginia Tech in 1934 with the highest academic average in his civil engineering class and was one of only two seniors in his class of 200 to be offered a job upon graduation.

       

      Rice began a long railroad career with that job with the Pennsylvania Railroad as a track supervisor. He left that job to serve the Army in World War II, directing overseas operations of the Military Railway Service in both the European and Pacific Theaters. He was was awarded the Legion of Merit with two Oak Leaf Clusters. He continued to serve in the Army Reserve and rose to the rank of major general. In 1999, Rice was inducted into the Army Transportation Corps Hall of Fame.

       

      After the war, Rice resumed his railroad career, going to work for the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac (RF&P) Railroad in 1946. He was elected president of that line in 1955, and two years later was appointed the president of the Atlantic Coast Line (ACL) Railroad Company. In that capacity, he worked with John W. Smith, president of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, to effect a merger of the two railroads, which took place on July 1, 1967. Rice was elected president of the new Seaboard Coast Line Railroad and in 1970, he was elected chairman and CEO of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Co. (SCL) of Richmond and its holding company, Seaboard Coast Line Industries. He retired in 1977 but was still active in the railroad industry. Rice worked with Hays T. Watkins to merge the SCL and the Chessie System to form CSX Corporation on Nov. 1, 1980. Rice served on CSX's original Board of Directors.

       

      Rice was also on the board of trustees for many business and philanthropic organizations, including: Borden, Inc., Florida Rock Industries, Bank of America and the Chemical Bank of New York. He served as a trustee of the Virginia Episcopal Seminary and of the American Association of Homes for the Aging, and was a member of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce, the Advisory Board of The Citadel, and Virginia Military Institute's Board of Visitors. He was awarded honorary doctorates in military science from The Citadel and in laws from Stetson University.

       

      At Virginia Tech, he endowed three scholarships for members of the Corps of Cadets who major in engineering, served as Director of the Virginia Tech Foundation, President of the Alumni Association, was a charter member of the Rowe Fellow Program, and a member of the College of Engineering Committee of 100, Ut Prosim Society, Corps of Cadets Alumni Board, William Preston Society, and several other university organizations. In recognition of his contributions, Virginia Tech presented Rice with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1973, the Engineering Distinguished Alumni Award in 1980, and the William Ruffner Medal in 1981.

       

      Rice died on Sunday, February 5, 2006, at the age of 93 in Richmond. He was preceded in death by his wife of 67 years, Jacqueline Johnston Rice, and a son, John Rice. Rice is survived by a daughter, Jaqueline Rice Heard, seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

    • 1964-70 Harry C. Wyatt

      Harry Cassell Wyatt served on the board of visitors from 1961 to 1968 and was rector from 1962 to 1964.

       

      Wyatt was a native of Ivanhoe in Wythe County, Va. He began working for the Norfolk & Western Railway in 1916 as a mail carrier at age 14 in Pulaski, Va., where his father was agent-yardmaster. He worked suring the summers for the railroad in Pulaski and Roanoke, Va., while attending Greenbrier Military Academy and Virginia Tech.

       

      Wyatt was graduated from Tech 1924 and went to work with the Norfolk & Western as a special apprentice in the Roanoke shops. He moved on to serve as an assistant foreman and foreman at Iaeger, W.Va., and as assistant road foreman of engines, general foreman, assistant master mechanic and superintendent of the Shenandoah, Scioto and Pocahontas divisions. In 1942, he returned to Roanoke as assistant general superintendent of motive power. It was in that postion that he was involved in the development of the J Class passenger locomotives and some of the last steam engines built in the Roanoke shops.

       

      In 1953, Wyatt moved up to vice president and general manager and senior vice president in 1963. He was involved in the growth of the railroad through the merger with the Virginian Railway in 1959 and the Nickel Plate-Wabash merger in 1964. He retired July 1, 1967.

       

      After Wyatt retired, he concentrated on raising prize-winning Hereford cattle on his Crestline Farm near Elliston, Va. He was also involved in many boards and civic activities, holding a position as a fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a director of First National Exchange Bank and its parent Dominion Bankshares Corp., director of First Federal Savings and Loan Association, a past president of Roanoke Symphony, a director of Roanoke Hospital Association and a leader in the Red Cross and a member of the Citizens Advisory Civic Center Committee.

       

      Wyatt died of an apparent heart attack in Anderson, S.C., on April 5, 1973, while returning from a family vacation in Florida. He is buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke. His wife, Frances Powell Wyatt, died in Sept., 1975, and is also buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke.

    • 1970-75 C. Eugene Rowe

      C. Eugene Rowe served on the board of visitors from 1968 to 1976 and was rector from 1970 to 1975.

       

      Rowe was a native of Northumberland County, Va., the son of the county treasurer. He had had to borrow money to enroll at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1926 as a business major. He was active in a variety of extracurricular activities, was editor of both the student newspaper and the yearbook, and was an officer in the Corps of Cadets. Rowe was a founder and first president of the VPI chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa, the student leadership fraternity.

       

      Rowe graduated in 1933, in the depths of the Great Depression, with academic honors. His first job was with the Continental Oil Co. in Richmond, Va., in accounting. Two years later, he began a 20-year association with Burlington Industries in North Carolina. While with Burlington, he completed an advanced management program through Harvard University. He then joined the Baldwin Piano Company in Cincinnati, Ohio, then moved to Dan River Mills (later Dan River Inc.) as secretary-treasurer, first at Danville, Va., and later at Greenville, S.C. At his retirement in 1976, he was Dan River's vice president and chief financial officer.

       

      While he was with Burlington, he married Salem, Va., native Mary Lewis Johnson. They had a son and a daughter. Rowe also remained connected with his alma mater, serving as a founding member of the original Central Carolina Alumni chapter. He was also a founding director of the VPI Educational Foundation (now the Virginia Tech Foundation) and one of the prime movers in the planning and fund-raising for the World War II memorial chapel. He was elected to the Alumni Association board in the early 1950s, served as vice president from 1958 to 1962 and president from 1962 to 1965. Rowe served succesively as president (from 1972 to 1982) and chairman (from 1982 to 1985) of the Virginia Tech Foundation.

       

      Rowe served two successive four-year terms (from 1968 to 1976) on the board of visitors and was rector from 1970 to 1975. He continued as a dedicated and active alumnus, so much so that Mary Lewis used to say, "I guess I married an institution as well as a man." In 1978, he was awared the William H. Ruffner Medal. Rowe remained active in alumni and university affairs until his death in 1987.

       

       

       

    • 1975-78 G. Frank Clement

      G. Frank Clement served on the board of visitors from 1971 to 1979 and was rector from 1975 to 1978.

       

      Clement was born Aug. 22, 1907. He went from selling insurance for the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co. to become president of the Shenandoah Life Insurance Co. in Roanoke, Va. He retired from that position in 1972 and served as chairman of the company until 1978.

       

      Community service was important to Clement. He served on an inter-racial committee in 1960s that led to the integration of restaurants, theaters, and companies in Roanoke. He continued to work for equal access when he resigned his membership in the Shenandoah Club in 1983 to protest its exclusionary policies.

       

      After retirement, he served on Roanoke City Council for the first six months of 1980 to fill an unexpired term of a member who had resigned. He was named the Roanoke Citizen of the Year in 1985 and was one of the first laureates inducted into the Southwest Virginia Business Hall of Fame when it was established in 1990 by Junior Achievement of Southwestern Virginia

       

      Clement led the fund-raising to help start Center in the Square in downtown Roanoke and served on the board of directors of the facility. He was also involved in many other community organizations. In a Feb. 15, 2009, article in The Roanoke Times, Bill Hopkins, a charter member of Center in the Square's board of directors, said Clement "was certainly one of Roanoke's most outstanding benefactors in the last half of the 20th century."

       

      He died March 1, 2001, at age 93 and is buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke.

       

    • 1978-81 Parke C. Brinkley

      Parke C. Brinkley served on the board of visitors from 1974 to 1982 and was rector from 1978 to 1981.

       

      Parke Culver Brinkley was born on July 31, 1915, to Fairlie Brinkley and Mary Emily Culver Brinkley. He grew up on a farm near Suffolk in Nansemond County, Va. He attended public schools in Nansemond County and graduated from Randolph Macon Academy in Bedford, Va. He attended Virginia Tech and was graduated in 1937. After graduation, he returned to Nansemond County as an extension agent, then was hired by the Association of Virginia Peanut and Hog Growers to be its first executive secretary. He was in that position when Gov. John Battle appointed him in 1950 to be the the commissioner of agriculture for the commonwealth. He served in that capacity until 1962. From there, he went on Washington, D.C., to serve as president of the National Agricultural Chemicals Association (NACA), a trade group of manufacturers and formulators of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides.

       

      During his time with the NACA, Brinkley was the face of the pesticide industry at the time Rachel Carson published her book "Silent Spring" that was critcal of the use of chemicals to control pests and was quoted and published quite extensively.

       

      He was on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In 1976, CropLife America presented Brinkley its Lea S. Hitchner Service Award in recognition of outstanding service to CropLife America and the crop protection industry.

       

      Brinkley retired in 1976 and devoted more time to his other love, sporting dogs. He was a founding director of the National Open Shooting Dog Championship Association in 1961 and is still listed as an honorary director of the organization. He contributed considerbably to how shooting dog trials are run and champions are determined. He won several championships himself with his dogs. He has been elected to the Field Trial Hall of Fame and the Pointer/Setter Hall of Fame.

       

      In 1980, Brinkley was an Alumni Distinguished Service award recipient from Virginia Tech. This award recognizes individuals for their contributions to the university. In 1986, he was presented with the William H. Ruffner Medal. This award was created to provide appropriate public recognition to individuals who have performed notable and distinguished service to the university.

       

      He married Dorothy Holland and they had a daughter, Kaye, and a son, Richard Fairlie. Dorothy died in 2002. He retired to Mecklenburg County and died at age 93 in South Hill, Va., on Nov. 26, 2008. He is buried in Liberty Springs Christian Church Cemetery in Suffolk.

       

    • 1981-83 Charles O. Gordon

      Charles O. Gordon served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1981 to 1983.

       

      Gordon grew up in Marion, the son of Pearl Cable Gordon and Lawrence Elliott Gordon, where he learned about entrepreneurship. He sold Burpee seeds, magazine subscriptions, Morton's Salt, and Hershey candy bars. By the time he was 12 years old, he was working summers carrying brick and mortar while training as a carpenter's helper. In 1936, the family moved to Johnson City, Tenn., and Gordon graduated from Science Hill High School. He went on to attend Virginia Tech and graduated in 1942, receiving a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering. The day after graduation, he married Evelyn Anderson of Marion, Va.

       

      Two weeks later, Gordon reported to Fort Eustis in Virginia. From there, he went on to the European theater to serve as a glider operations officer in the Army Air Corps. As a glider pilot, Gordon commanded the 435th Glider Pilot Infantry Company, the first and only all officer combat unit. For his heroism in combat, he earned the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Presidential Citation, the Air Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge, Airborne Infantry Wings, seven Battle Stars, and three Bronze Arrowheads for Airborne invasions.

       

      In 1945, the Gordons moved to Johnson City, where he began working for his father, president of Empire Furniture. Charles Gordon went to the lumberyard, determined to learn the business from the ground up. He established Gordon's Inc., a furniture manufacturing company, in 1947. He was known to load a pick-up truck himself and attend furniture markets to introduce his pieces to buyers. Soon, his clientele included Macy's, Marshall Fields, and other retail outlets in the United States and Canada.

       

      In 1946, Gordon and his brother-in-law Sam Y. Harding started the Tip Bottling Company. They changed its name to Tri-City Beverage Corporation in 1948. Gordon saw an ad in the National Bottling Gazette and contacted William Swartz, the chemist who developed the formula for Dr Enuf. Gordon and Swartz struck a deal, and Tri-City Beverage began bottling Dr. Enuf in 1949. Gordon went on to develop the soft drink Mountain Dew and designed the original bottle, a collector's item today.

       

      Gordon continued his success, starting and venturing into a number of different businesses and charities and involvement in his community and with his alma mater. He started and served as the chairman and chief executive officer of the Bydand Corporation and continued as chairman of the Tri-City Beverage Corporation and Peace River Citrus Groves Inc. He also founded Gordon's Marine, selling and servicing Johnson Motors, and he operated the first independently owned Orvis Store known as the Great Outdoors Shop.

       

      Gordon served as president of the following organizations: Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association, Furniture Library Foundation, and the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games. He served for 35 years as a member of the board of directors of Home Financial Corporation. He served as a member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board for 50 years and 12 years as chairman. In February 1972, he received the Salvation Army National Award, called Others, and in 1989 he was presented with the distinguished William Booth Award. In 1983, he was made an honorary life member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board. He was named Man of the Year by the Board of Governors of the American Furniture Mart in June, 1969, and in November 1978 was honored with the Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association's distinguished James T. Ryan Award.

       

      He served as Mayor of Johnson City in 1969, was a charter member and past president of the Lions Club, and a past member of the Rotary Club. The Greater Tri-Cities Business Alliance inducted him into the Junior Achievement Hall of Fame in 2000. Gordon was a member of Munsey Memorial United Methodist Church.

       

      Gordon served as a director of the Virginia Tech Education Foundation and is a past president of the Alumni Association and the Student Aid Association. He funded an endowed professorship in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department and served as a member of the College of Engineering Committee of 100. He served on the board of visitors for eight years, from 1976 to 1984, and was rector from 1981 to 1983. He is the man most responsible for the original planning of the German Club on campus and a recent addition. In 1974, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1985 was the recipient of the William H. Ruffner Medal, the highest recognition given by the university.

       

      Gordon died Aug. 15, 2004, at Johnson City Medical Center at age 84. He was preceded in death by one son, Jack Curtis Gordon; one brother, Lawrence E. Gordon; and one sister, Marie Harding Ferrari. He was survived by his wife, Evelyn Anderson Gordon; five children, Mary Alice Hardin, Charles O. Gordon Jr., Lucretia Gordon, Evelyn Sexton Gordon, and Robert Preston Gordon; 10 grandchildren; 3 great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

       

    • 1983-84 Lee C. Tait

      Lee C. Tait served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1983 to 1984.

       

      Tait was born in 1919 in Fitchburg, Mass., and raised in West Virginia. He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1941 with a bachlor's degree in electrical engineering. He served as regimental commander of the Corps of Cadets and was a member of the German Club. After graduation, he went to work for Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. in Richmond, VA. Several weeks after accepting his position, Tait took military leave and served in the U.S. Army in Europe and North Africa from 1941 to 1946, attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was awarded the Bronze Star, the French Croix de Guerre, and was appointed an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire.

       

      Tait returned to Chesapeake & Potomac in 1946 to a position as an engineer assistant and a year later was promoted to engineer. He earned a master's degree in industrial management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1956. Tait rose through management positions in engineering, traffic, finance, and general operations in locations around Washington, Virginia, West Virginia, and New York, where he was assistant vice president of AT&T. He returned to Richmond in 1970 as vice president and director of Chesapeake & Potomac of Virginia, a position he held until his retirement in 1984, ending a 43-year career.

       

      Tait was chairman of several organizations, including the Richmond Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges, and the Richmond United Givers Fund Drive. Heserved on the boards of Shenandoah Life Insurance Co., Southern Bank & Trust Co., the YMCA of Greater Richmond, the Richmond Symphony, and the Science Museum of Virginia.

       

      Tait served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1983 to 1984. He served as president of the Alumni Association and in 1985, and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Richmond chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. In 1983, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1987 he was the recipient of the William H. Ruffner Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the university.

       

      Tait died Dec. 27, 2007, at age 88 in Richmond. He was survived by his wife of 61 years, Hazel Caldwell; one son, Raymond C. Tait and wife, Teresa Deshields; and three daughters, Deborah T. Grover and husband, William, Maryanne Hill and Betti Tait Garber and husband, Gregory; four grandchildren, Leigh Kelly Tait, Sarah Deshields Tait, Morgan Lee Garber and Jordan Caldwell Hill.

       

       

       

    • 1984-87 A. F. Giacco

      Alexander F. Giacco served on the board of visitors from 1979 to 1987 and was rector from 1984 to 1987.

       

      Giacco grew up in Meriden, Conn., the oldest of four children. He attended and graduated from Virginia Tech in 1942 with a bacehlor's degree in chemical engineering. He went to work for Hercules Inc., starting a 45-year career that culminated in his service as the company's president from 1977 to 1987 and chairman of the board from 1980 until his retirement in 1987.

       

      After retirement from Hercules, Giacco went on to serve as chairman and CEO of Himont Inc., a joint venture in polypropylene between Hercules and Italy's Montedison. He also served as president and CEO of Rheometric Scientific Inc., a company that designs, manufactures, and services computer-controlled materials test systems used to make physical property measurements, such as viscosity, elasticity, and thermal analysis behavior on various materials such as plastics, petrochemicals, paints, coatings, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and foods. He also served as chairman and managing director of Axess Corporation, a company that produces polymers and thermoplastics.

       

      In 1984, Financial World named Giacco best chief executive officer in the chemical industry. The Wall Street Transcript voted him the Chemical Industry's Outstanding Chief Executive Officer for three consecutive years in the 1980s.

       

      After Giacco retired from Hercules, the company established the Alexander F. Giacco Presidential Chair at Virginia Tech with a $1 million endowment. The Alexander F. Giacco Engineering Scholarship Fund was subsequently established through his support. He served as a member of the board of visitors from 1979 to 1987 and was rector from 1984 to 1987. He was inducted into the College of Engineering's Academy of Engineering Excellence in 2000 and was a member of the college's Committee of 100. In 1989, he received the University Distinguished Achievement Award for "significant achievement of enduring significance to society." In 2002, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award.

       

      Giacco and his wife, Edith, raised five children in their home in Wilmington, Del. They were also active in the community in a variety of organizations. In 1985, Pierre S. duPont III realized that the charitable needs of Delaware's nonprofit agencies and institutions were more than existing resources could support. He approached DuPont CEO Edward G. Jefferson and Hercules CEO Alexander F. Giacco for help in establishing the Delaware Community Foundation. Giacco was one of the founding members of the board of the foundation. He was also involved in The Grand, which restored The Grand Opera House from a run-down move theatre into a downtown attraction. He is recognized as a chairman emeritus of the board of directors. "The baby grand" began as the historic Aldine Theater built in 1921. It was acquired by The Grand in 1992 to create the Edith and Alexander F. Giacco Building in 2000, and now it's a cozy 305-seat theater that occupies the first floor.

       

    • 1987-89 W. S. White Jr.

      W. S. "Pete" White Jr. served on the board of visitors from 1981 to 1989 and was rector from 1987 to 1989.

       

      White was born in 1926 and grew up in eastern Virginia. He enrolled in the Virginia Tech College of Engineering in 1943, and graduated in 1948 with a bachelor degree in electrical engineering. His studies were interrupted by more than a year of military service. He went to work for American Gas & Electric Co. (it changed its name to American Electric Power Co. (AEP) in 1958).

       

      White served in a variety of positions with AEP. He earned a master's degree in industrial management as a Sloan Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1958. He was elected chairman of American Electric Power in 1976, which had always been located in New York City. In 1980, the company moved its headquarters from New York to Columbus, Ohio. On Jan. 1, 1991, White stepped down as chief executive officer and retired as chairman effective Dec. 31, 1991.

       

      White served as president of the USNC of CIGRÉ and ascended to the chair of CIGRÉ international in the 1980s. CIGRÉ is an acronym for a French title that means The International Council For Large Electric Systems, which is headquartered in Paris.

       

      White serves on the board of the Virginia Tech Foundation and was a founding member of the Academy of Engineering Excellence. AEP has also created a chaired professorship in engineering in White's name. White received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1989 and was presented with the William H. Ruffner Medal in 1990.

       

      White is married to Adele McComas, the widow of Jim McComas, Virginia Tech's 13th president, who came from the University of Toledo to accept the position here. They met while White was on the board of visitors in 1988. When Jim McComas became ill, the family moved back to their native Ohio and White's wife, LaVerne, was very supportive during that time. She died shortly after Jim McComas did in 1994. Two years later, White issued a dinner invitation and in 2000 the pair were married. They have continued their connection to Virginia Tech since then.

       

       

       

    • 1989-91 Clifford A. “Cliff” Cutchins

      Clifford A. "Cliff" Cutchins III served on the board of visitors from 1965 to 1976 and again from 1987 to 1991 and was rector from 1989 to 1991.

       

      Cutchins grew up in Franklin in Southampton County, Va. He followed his father, Clifford A. Cutchins Jr., Class of 1915, to Virginia Tech. The younger Cutchins started out as a member of the Class of 1944, but those students had their studies interupted when they were called to serve in World War II. Cutchins served in the Pacific Theater as a captain in the U.S. Army, then returned to Virginia Tech to complete his degree in accounting in 1947.

       

      Cutchins' grandfather, C.A. Cutchins, ran a feed store in downtown Franklin, and his uncle, Cecil Vaughan, ran Vaughan & Co. Bank, which the family had established in 1886. After graduation, the younger Cutchins went to work as a teller in that bank, and over the next 13 years he worked his way up the ranks, becoming its president in 1960.

       

      Shortly afterward he negotiated a merger with two local banks to create Tidewater Bank and Trust Co. That bank then merged into Virginia National Bank, and by 1969 he had moved up to president. By 1980 he was elected chairman and chief executive officer of the holding company, Virginia National Bankshares Inc. Over the years, Cutchins engineered a number of acquisitions and mergers, and in 1983 Virginia National merged with First & Merchants Corp. to form Sovran. Cutchins became chairman and CEO of Sovran Financial Corporation in Virginia Beach, Va., a position he held until he retired in 1989 and was made an honorary director.

       

      In addition to banking, Cutchins also was a dairy farmer, operating on more than 600 acres in Franklin. He was one of the frontrunners in area dairy and hog farming, which netted him a posthumous induction into the Virginia Livestock Hall of Fame in 2011.

       

      Cutchins was also involved in other services to the state and community. He was a member of the board of trustees of the Virginia Retirement System, a trustee of the Science Museum of Virginia, a director of the Business Consortium for Arts Support, a director of The Norfolk Forum, a director of the National Maritime Center Foundation, a trustee of the Nature Conservancy, and served on the Virginia Business Higher Education Council. He was also a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award (he earned his Eagle Scout rank in 1937), which is granted to those who have a strong record of voluntary service to their community, among other things.

       

      In addition to serving two different terms on the board of visitors (1965 to 1976 and 1987 to 1991), including serving as rector from 1989 to 1991, Cutchins served on the board of the Virginia Tech Foundation and was an honorary member of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. He established the Clifford A. Cutchins Endowed Scholarship and the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Scholarship Endowment. He was a charter member of both the Ut Prosim Society and the President's Circle, which recognizes donors who have given more than $1 million to Virginia Tech.

       

      In recognition of his willingness to lend a hand, the university honored Cutchins a number of times over the years. In 1974, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1984 he received the University Distinguished Achievement Award. In 1995, he received the William H. Ruffner Medal, the university's highest award for service.

       

      Cutchins died Dec. 24, 2002, at age 79 in Virginia Beach. He was survived by his wife of 55 years, Ann Woods Cutchins; and three sons, Clifford Armstrong Cutchins IV and his wife, Jane, William Witherspoon Cutchins and his wife, Caroline, and Cecil Vaughan Cutchins and his wife, Anne. He was also survived by two sisters, Keith Cutchins DeMoss of Nashvile, Tenn. and Katherine Cutchins Billingham of Syracuse, New York; and eight grandchildren, Sarah Cutchins Ewing, Ann Woods Cutchins, William Witherspoon Cutchins, Caroline Davidson Cutchins, Elizabeth Matthews Cutchins, Cecil Vaughan Cutchins Jr., Allison Armstrong Cutchins and Clifford A. Cutchins V.

       

    • 1991-96 Clifton C. “Cliff” Garvin

      Clifton C. "Cliff" Garvin served on the board of visitors from 1988 to 1996 and was rector from 1991 to 1996.

       

      Garvin was a Portsmouth, Va., native who graduated with honors from Virginia Tech in 1943 with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. After three years of service with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the South Pacific, he returned to Blacksburg to earn a master's degree in chemical engineering in 1947.

       

      Garvin went to work as a process engineer in an oil refinery in Louisiana for the company now known as Exxon, eventually becoming refinery manager. Garvin also served in other jobs, including vice president of Humble (predecessor of Exxon USA) and executive assistant to the chairman of the board. He worked in Baton Rouge, Tulsa, Midland, Houston, Los Angeles, and New York as he worked his way up to president of the corporation in 1972; he was selected chairman and chief executive officer in 1975. He remained CEO of Exxon until 1986, when he retired.

       

      Garvin was also been a member and director of numerous national and international corporations including director of Georgia Pacific, Citicorp, Citibank, Johnson & Johnson, J.C. Penny Co. Inc., PepsiCo Inc., Sperry Corporation, TRW Inc., and the United Way of Tri-state. He has honorary doctorate degrees from New York University, Stevens Institute of Technology, and Georgetown University. He was the recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from Texas Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association and the C. Walter Nichols Award from New York University Graduate School of Business. The government of the Netherlands has also honored Garvin.

       

      Garvin also continually served Virginia Tech in a variety of ways. He served from 1988 to 1996 on the university's board of visitors, including five years as rector (from 1991 to 1996). He served as vice chairman of the Campaign for Excellence, Virginia Tech's first national fund-raising campaign; was chairman of the Virginia Tech Annual Fund; and was a member of the Corporate Development Council and Council of 100 in the College of Engineering. In addition, Garvin's generous endowments to the university have helped to establish two professorships, one in the arts and sciences and the other in engineering. He was a Virginia Tech Foundation board member and was a member of the Ut Prosim Society.

       

      To recognize his contributions to the university, Garvin was the first recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in 1983. He was presented the William H. Ruffner Medal, the university's highest honor, in 1997. He received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2001. In 2002, he received an honorary Doctor of Science degree. Garvin died on April 17, 2016. He was 94.

       

    • 1996-97 Henry J. Dekker

      Henry J. Dekker served on the board of visitors from 1989 to 1997 and was rector from 1996 to 1997.

       

      Dekker was born in 1920 in Norfolk, Va., to John Peter and Frieda Tiedemann Dekker. The family lived in Norfolk and Virginia Beach. He graduated from Oceana High School in 1937 and attended the Norfolk Division of William and Mary for one year. Dekker came to Virginia Tech in September 1940 as a member of the class of 1944, but like many other students of that time, his studies were interrupted by a call from the military.

       

      Dekker's three years of military service during World War II, from March 1943 until 1946, was as an officer in the U.S. Army in the 11th Airborne Division. He trained as a paratrooper and served in the Philippines, Okinawa, and Japan (occupation.)

       

      Dekker returned to Virginia Tech to graduate in June 1947 from the Pamplin College of Business with a degree in advanced accounting. While he was at Virginia Tech (before and after his military service), Dekker served in the Corps of Cadets from September 1940 until March 1943 (Army service) in the Accelerated Program of Year Round classes. He was elected president of the Class of 1944 for each of three years and was elected president of the Corps of Cadets in January 1943. He also served as vice president of the German Club (1942 to 1943) and president in 1946 and 1947. He was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa, the Leadership Society, and was active in student government.

       

      Dekker served as the university's treasurer for two years after graduation while he completed all the coursework for a master's degree. He left the treasurer's office and moved to Greensboro, N.C., where he joined Eugene C. Rowe, Class of 1933, vice president and treasurer of Burlington Industries, as an assistant in May 1951. He moved to New York with Burlington, then Deering Milliken, followed by Hoechst Fibers, and Texfi Industries. In 1979, he founded became president of the North American operations of French couturier Louis Feraud Inc. His sales career gave him considerable international experience in Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Hong Kong, and Japan. He retired as vice chairman of Louis Feraud in 1991.

       

      Dekker's passions were the German Club, the Corps of Cadets, the Pamplin College of Business, and Virginia Tech. He assisted Charles O. Gordon Sr., Class of 1942, in the Campaign for the Second Century of the German Club. He was one of the leaders of the of the campaign for the revitalization of the corps from 1992 to 2002. He served on the board of visitors from 1989 to 1997, and was rector from 1996 to 1997. He also served on the Advisory Committee of the university Center for Leadership Studies. He was a senior benefactor of the Ut Prosim Society, a member of the Legacy Society, and a member of the William Preston Society (former board member).

       

      Dekker was also generous to the university, establishing a $10 million scholarship endowment and leading the effort to create the Corps Center for Leader Development.

       

      The university recognized Dekker's service in a variety of ways. In 1987, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award. He was a recipient of the Pamplin College of Business Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1990. In 1999, Dekker was named the recipient of William Henry Ruffner Medal, the university's highest honor for dedicated and distinguished service. He also was the class ring collection namesake for the Class of 1998.

       

      The Dekkers moved back to Blacksburg, Va., from New York in 1980 but he continued to commute to New York for 11 years. Dekker was married to Louisa Kent Otey Hoge Gillet. They had three children, Louisa Kent, Alice Hoge, and Peyton Gillet. They had five grandchildren, Eric Richardson, Alex Richardson, Ashley Dekker, Henry Dekker III, and Peyton Dekker. Tragically, their eldest daughter, Louisa Kent, died on Feb. 27, 2007, and Dekker's wife of 57 years died May 3, 2007. Dekker died June 13, 2011, at the age of 90.

       

    • 1997-2002 James E. Turner Jr.

      James E. Turner Jr. served on the board of visitors from 1994 to 2002 and was rector from 1997 to 2002.

       

      Turner was born April 21, 1934, in Isle of Wight. He came to Virginia Tech and graduated in 1956 with a bachelor's degree in agricultural engineering. Upon graduation, Turner began his career in 1957 with the Newport News Shipbuilding Co. of the Tenneco Corp., where he spent 25 years advancing through several positions including design engineer, operations supervisor, superintendent, and manager of manufacturing.

       

      In 1975, Turner moved to Westinghouse Corp. as vice president and was named general manager in 1978. In 1981 he rejoined Newport News Shipbuilding as vice president until his departure in September 1988, at which time he went on to become corporate vice president and general manager of General Dynamics Corporation's Electric Boat Division, the company's nuclear submarine division. Turner was named executive vice president of the corporation in February 1991, with responsibility for marine, land systems, and services businesses. He became president of Electric Boat in April 1993, while concurrently serving as an executive vice president of the corporation.

       

      In 1995, Turner began leading the company's Marine Systems Group and in June 1997, he was elected president and chief operating officer of General Dynamics. He retired from that postion on Jan. 15, 2000.

       

      In his professional postion, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1998, which honored him for "leading the implementation of innovative engineering and design processes, and establishing a new standard for naval ship design and acquisition." Turner was the 1999 recipient of the Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz Award from the Navy League of the United States, which honors industry leaders who have made major contributions to U.S. maritime strength.

       

      Turner was active as a student at Virginia Tech, spending two years in the Corps of Cadets, playing football, and being a member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi honor fraternities. He continued to maintained a close relationship with his alma mater throughout the years, serving on the Academy of Engineering Excellence, the Virginia Tech Foundation board of directors, and the College of Engineering's Committee of 100. He is a member of the Ut Prosim Society and a charter member of the President's Circle. He served on the board of visitors (from 1994 to 2002) and was rector (from 1997 to 2002).

       

      In recognition of his contributions, the university in 1994 presented Turner with the University Distinguished Achievement Award. He received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2003 and the university's highest award, the William H. Ruffner Medal, in 2004.

       

      He and his wife, Elizabeth Nelms Turner, have two grown sons. They have homes in Connecticut, Reston, Va., and St. John's County, Fla.

       

    • 2002-04 John G. Rocovich

      John G. Rocovich served on the board of visitors from 1997 to 2005 and was appointed to a term to serve from 2010 through 2014 and was rector from 2002 to 2004.

       

      Rocovich was born in Roanoke, Va., on Jan. 19, 1945. He graduated from Blacksburg High School in 1963 and attended Virginia Tech, graduating cum laude from the College of Business in 1966. He attended law school at the University of Richmond and earned his juris doctorate and passed the Virginia bar in 1967. Rocovich then entered New York University, where he graduated with his Master of Law in taxation in 1968.

       

      Rocovich returned to Roanoke to establish the law firm Moss & Rocovich, where he practices taxation and trusts and estates law. He has been admitted to the bar in Virginia, District of Columbia, U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Tax Court, U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the 4th and 8th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

       

      Rocovich has also made Virginia Tech the central focus of his life, with much of his work in support of the university and often behind the scenes. In 1986, Rocovich orchestrated a $4.7 million gift for the benefit of Virginia Tech's Chemistry Department to create the Harvey W. Peters Research Center for the Study of Parkinson's Disease and Disorders of the Central Nervous System. Since its founding, the endowment, directed by Rocovich, has grown to $11.5 million, and the center has made strides in the understanding of the disease.

       

      In 1987, Rocovich arranged another gift to the university. This time, two departments in the College of Engineering were endowed, each with a $5 million gift. Each year, the growing return from the endowment funds several dozen undergraduate and graduate scholarships and fellowships in the Harry Lynde Bradley Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering and in the Charles E. Via Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The endowment also funds several other programs.

       

      The colleges of Engineering, Business, Natural Resources, and Arts and Sciences have each benefited from Rocovich's allegiance. So have the Corps of Cadets, the Athletic Association, and the 4-H Center. In recognition of his support, the John G. Rocovich Shooting Sports Complex at the W.E. Skelton 4-H Educational Conference Center was named for Rocovich. He served as member and president of the Virginia Tech Foundation, was president of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association, and on the board of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Alumni Foundation. He served on the board of visitors for one term, from 1997 to 2005, and as rector from 2002 to 2004, and is serving a second term that started in 2010.

       

      His interest and support extends beyond Virginia Tech to other areas of education and civic organizations. He founded the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg and is the Chairman of its board of directors. He also was a member of the board of trustees of Mary Baldwin College, a member of the board of visitors of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, a member of the Education Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, a member of the board of directors and treasurer of the Western Virginia Foundation for Arts and Sciences, member of the board of directors of the Art Museum of Western Virginia, a member of the board of trustees and chairman of the Virginia Museum of Natural History. He served as a member of the Governor's Commission on Champion Schools from 1994 to 1996, was a member of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education from 1998 to 2000, and a member of the Governor's Distance Learning Steering Committee from 1999 to 2000.

       

      To recognize his contributions to the university, Rocovich was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2000.

       

    • 2004-06 Ben J. Davenport Jr.

      Ben J. Davenport Jr. served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2004 to 2006.

       

      Davenport is a native of Chatam, Va. He attended Hargrave Military Academy and Virginia Tech, graduating from from the Pamplin College of Business in 1964 with a bachelor of science degree in business.

       

      In 1941, his father, Ben J. Davenport Sr., founded Davenport Energy, a small oil jobbership. Davenport Jr. returned to Chatam to work for the company and helped grow it into a multifaceted company providing quality petroleum products to a customer base throughout southside Virginia and North Carolina. The company has seven regional offices serving more than 21,000 customers. Davenport is chairman of the firm.

       

      In 1969, First Piedmont Corporation, a full-service waste management company, was incorporated. The company provides waste hauling, disposal, and recycling services in Virginia and North Carolina, plus a special waste hauling division serves multiple states. Davenport is also chairman of that firm.

       

      In addition to his business interests, Davenport is involved in a variety of other activities. He is a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation. He sits on the board of American National Bank and Trust and of Boxley Materials. He serves on the boards of Hargrave Military Academy, the Danville Regional Foundation, and the Future of the Piedmont Foundation.

       

      Davenport has also been a strong supporter of Virginia Tech and of southside Virginia. He was a driving force behind efforts to revitalize the economy of southside Virginia, championing the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research in Danville, which was created in 2004 with Virginia Tech as an academic partner, and is a member of the board of the institute. He served on the Pamplin Advisory Council, the Virginia Tech Foundation Board, and the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Policy Advisory Board, and participated in the Hokies for Higher Education initiative. Through his exceptional generosity to Virginia Tech he was made a member of the Ut Prosim Society President's Circle.

       

      Davenport served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2004 to 2006, during one of the most challenging periods in the university's history — during the tragedy of April 16, 2007, and its aftermath.

       

    • 2006-08 Jacob A. Lutz III

      Jacob A. Lutz III served on the board of visitors from 2000 to 2008 and was rector from 2006 to 2008.

       

      Lutz attended Virginia Tech, graduating in 1978 with a bachelor's degree (with distinction) in finance from the Pamplin College of Business. He then went on to the College of William and Mary, where he graduated with a Juris Doctorate in 1981.

       

      Lutz went to work as an attorney for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in Washington, D.C., remaining there until 1984, when he moved to Atlanta as senior regional attorney for the FDIC. He became a partner with Troutman Sanders in 1990, serving in various capacities in his Richmond, Va., law firm. He at present is a managing partner and chairs the firm's Financial Institutions Practice Group, which represents national banks, state banks, thrifts, credit unions, securities firms, insurance companies, and related financial services providers domestically and internationally.

       

      In addition to serving on the board of visitors for two terms (from 2000 to 2008) and as rector (from 2006 top 2008), Lutz serves on the board of directors for the Virginia Tech Foundation (from 2006 to present) and served on its Executive Committee (from 2006 to 2008), was chair of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Policy Advisory Board (from 2002 to 2006), and is a member of the Pamplin Advisory Council for the Pamplin School of Business (from 2006 to present). Lutz also has served his alma mater by participating in the Hokies for Higher Education initiative, as a member of the Hokie Club and the Caldwell Society, one of the university’s official donor recognition societies. He has generously supported the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, most notably providing funding to name the Jacob A. Lutz Greenhouse Teaching Complex in honor of his father's educational legacy.

       

       

       

    • 2008-10 John R. Lawson II

      John R. Lawson II served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2008 to 2010.

       

      Lawson is a 1975 graduate of Virginia Tech, from the College of Science with a bachelor's degree in geophysics. In 1958, William M. Jordan and Robert T. Lawson founded W. M. Jordan Company, Inc.; it is now the largest construction company based in Virginia. Lawson went to work for his father and is now the president and chief executive officer of the firm, which has its corporate headquarters in Newport News, and its regional office in Richmond.

       

      Lawson received the Ernst and Young Virginia Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2004, the Lenora Mathews Lifetime Achievement Award from the Volunteer Hampton Roads in 2003, and the United Way Volunteer of the Year Award in 1997. Lawson serves on numerous boards in his community, including those for TowneBank; the Fort Monroe Authority, for which he is vice chairman; Children's Health System, for which he is chairman; and the Mariners' Museum, for which he is chairman.

       

      Lawson has served two terms on the board of visitors (from 2002 to 2010) as a rector (from 2008 to 2010). He has supported numerous programs of the university, most notably providing funding for the the Myers-Lawson School of Construction, which was named in honor of him and his former fraternity brother, A. Ross Myers (who also shared in the funding). Lawson also served as co-chair of the National Campaign Steering Committee for the $1 Billion Campaign for Virginia Tech, which generated $1.11 billion in gifts or commitments to the university between July 2003 and June 2011. He is a member of the Ut Prosim Society President's Circle and a board member of the Myers-Lawson School of Construction. In 2012, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award, which is presented each year at commencement to recognize individuals for their contributions to the university.

       

      He is married to the former Paige Zemany of Virginia Beach, and they have three children: Taylor, Tess and Jack.

       

    • 2010-12 George Nolen

      George Nolen has served on the board of visitors from 2005 to the present and has served as rector from 2010 to present.

       

      Nolen was raised in northern Virginia, attended Virginia Tech, and graduated in 1978 from the Pamlin College of Business with a degree in marketing. He went to work for Siemens in sales and moved up through the company over a 25-year period. He went from senior vice president of sales and services for Siemens Business Communication Systems Inc. In 1998, he was named president and CEO of Siemens Enterprise Networks LLC and then president and CEO of Siemens Information and Communication Networks Inc. (now Siemens Communications Inc.).

       

      In 2004, Nolen was named president and chief executive officer of Siemens Corporation, the U.S. subsidiary of Siemens, AG, a position he held until he retired in August 2009. After a brief retirement, Nolen became a member of the board of directors of InVivo Therapeutics Corporation, a medical device companyin Cambridge, Mass.

       

    • 2012-14 Michael J. Quillen

      Michael Quillen is an alumnus of Virginia Tech’s Class of 1971, having graduated with a master’s degree in civil engineering.  He is currently chairman of the board of Alpha Natural Resources in Abingdon, Va., where he formerly served as president and CEO.

       

      Prior to joining Alpha in 2002, Mr. Quillen served for four years as Executive Vice President for Operations of AMCI Metals and Coal International, Inc., where he was also responsible for AMCI’s Australian properties.  Mr. Quillen has more than 30 years of experience in the coal industry, beginning as an engineer and rising to the senior executive level.  He has held positions as vice president for operations of Pittston Coal Company, president of Pittston Coal Sales Corporation, vice president of AMVEST Corporation, vice president for operations of NERCO Coal Corporation, and president and CEO of Addington, Inc.  He currently serves on the board of Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.

       

    • 2014-16 Deborah L. Petrine

      Ms. Deborah Martin Petrine, of Hardy, earned her bachelor’s in business administration from the Virginia Tech in 1978. She is president and chief executive officer of CCR (Commonwealth Care of Roanoke Inc.), which owns and operates 12 long-term-care facilities in Virginia. Petrine founded the company in 2001, and also is a former president of Longleaf Senior Living LLC, which managed 32 assisted living facilities in North Carolina.  Petrine serves on the boards of directors for the Virginia Tech Foundation and the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. She is a member of the cabinet of the Pamplin Advisory Council and also is a member of the Roanoke Valley Hokie Club.  Petrine has served on the advisory board for the management department of Virginia Tech’s Pamplin College of Business. She also has served on the advisory board for the Virginia Tech Center for Gerontology. In 2005, Petrine received the Virginia Health Care Association’s James G. Dutton Award for lifetime achievement in the long-term-care field in the commonwealth. She received the Pamplin Distinguished Alumni Award in 2011.

    • 2016-17 James L. “Jim” Chapman, IV

      Mr. James L. Chapman, IV, class of 1979, is a senior partner in the law firm of Crenshaw, Ware & Martin in Norfolk, Virginia. He attended law school at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Mr. Chapman’s legal career has been largely in the practice areas of admiralty, business, litigation and transportation law. He is listed in Best Lawyers in America and Virginia Super Lawyers, and has earned the AV® Preeminent™ Peer Review Rating by LexisNexis Martindal-Hubbell. He also teaches at Regent University School of Law as an adjunct professor. Mr. Chapman has been an active alumni supporter of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. He has served as a director and officer of diverse non-profit and professional organizations at the local, regional and national level, including Rotary, Navy League of the United States, Southeastern Admiralty Law Institute, Future of Hampton Roads, and Sorenson Institute for Political Leadership.

       

    • 2017-current Dennis H. Treacy

      Mr. Treacy is President of the Smithfield Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Smithfield Foods. The Smithfield Foundation provides educational scholarships to the dependent children and grandchildren of full-time and retired employees of Smithfield. In addition, the Foundation also helps fund educational partnerships, food security programs, environmental projects, animal well-being initiatives, university research, and local projects. Previously, Mr. Treacy served as Executive Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer for Smithfield Foods, where he directed many areas within the company, including government affairs, corporate communications, environmental programs, sustainability initiatives, and the legal department. Mr. Treacy also serves or has served on dozens of state and national boards and commissions. Prior to joining Smithfield Foods in 2002, he served as director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. He also served as assistant attorney general in the natural resources section of the Virginia Attorney General’s office. He is a 2010 “Distinguished Environmental Law Graduate” from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon, where he graduated in 1983. He completed his undergraduate degree in Forestry and Wildlife at Virginia Tech in 1978.

  • Members ( alphabetical )

    All members of the board of visitors are listed below through 2017 appointments,

    along with their years of service on the board. Special designations, if any, are noted as follows:

     

    *Ex-officio  |  **Rector

    Adams, Berkeley D., 1913-20

    Anderson, Joseph R., 1872-73

    Anzilotti, Michael, 2003-11

    Armstrong, E. J., 1876-79

    Bagley, Richard M., 1988-96

    Barbour, B. J., 1876-78

    Bari, Susan P., 1997-2001

    Barker, J. M., 1909-13*

    Barlow, Joseph H., 1992-95*

    Barton, Joseph M., 1889-95

    Bennett, James L., 198784-86*

    Beverley, J. H. C., 1904-05*

    Beverley, R. Carter, 1921-24

    Beverley, Robert, 1872-74

    Beverley, Robert, 1919-21

    Black, Harvey, 1872-76**

    Blewett, W. C. Jr., 1963-65

    Bliss, C. H., 1881-82

    Boatwright, Mrs. R. G., 1944-53

    Bocock, Thomas S., 1873-75

    Bolling, Mrs. A. Stuart Jr., 1967-71

    Bowman, Alpheus Michael, 1911-14

    Brinkley, Parke C., 1974-82**

    Broaddus, Andrew, 1881-85

    Broaddus, William G., 1987-95

    Brockenbrough, B. B., 1899-1903

    Brown, J. Thompson, 1889-1908; 1912-21**

    Brownell, James F., 1981-82*

    Bruce, Charles, 1880-81

    Bruce, David K. E., 1946-47

    Buchanan, John L., 1886-89*

    Burks, E. C., 1875-79

    Burruss, W. H., 1947-55

    Button, Charles W., 1877-80

    Byrd, Harry F., 1929-44

    Carr, Mitchell O., 1994-98; 2000-04

    Carrington, J. C., 1901-12**

    Carson, R. P., 1880-81**

    Carter, H. L., 1889-93

    Casto, Harold, 1970-74

    Chapman, James L., 2013-17

    Churchman, J. W., 1909*

    Clark, Charles Champ, 1987-90*

    Claytor, Mary Fred, 1953-61

    Claytor, Robert B., 1982-90

    Clement, G. Frank, 1971-79**

    Clisham, Gary, 1998-2002

    Cloyd, D. M., 1891-1905

    Cloyd, Joseph, 1872-73

    Cobb, Frederick J., 2008-12

    Cochran, Alexander B., 1873-76

    Cochran, George M., 1960-68

    Cochran, R. S., 1906

    Coles, Walter, 1875-78

    Cowan, John T., 1872-73

    Cowherd, Roderick, 1959-63*

    Craig, R. S., 1914-18

    Cranwell, William C., 1984-88

    Cutchins, Clifford A. III, 1965-76; 1987-91**

    Dalton, Beverley, 2004-12

    Davenport, Ben J. Jr., 2002-10**

    Davis, Westmoreland, 1942

    DeJarnette, D. C., 1872-76

    Dekker, Henry J., 1989-97**

    Delano, Robert B., 1994-98

    diZerega, Mary Howe, 1984-88

    Driskill, Buford L. Jr., 1990-94

    Duke, Michele “Shelly” L., 2005-13

    Dunford, C. Don, 1994

    Dye, Nancy V., 2012-16

    Eberwine, Vernon G., 1944-56**

    Edmonds, Thomas, 1878-82

    Eggleston, Joseph D. Jr., 1906-12*

    Eggleston, William, 1876-79**

    Erwin, William J., 1960-68

    Eskridge, Allen, 1924-52

    Etheridge, Bennie J., 1997-2001*

    Fahl, Douglas R., 2008-12

    Fairchild, William D., 2012-16

    Faircloth, John T. Jr., 1973-81*

    Farr, R. R., 1882-86*

    Faulk, Cordel L., 2012-15

    Ferguson, Homer L., 1930-38

    Ferguson, Meade, 1920-24

    Ferneyhough, J. G., 1928-30

    Finney, L. Stanford, 1937-42*

    Fishburn, J. P., 1948-54

    Fitzgerald, T. B., 1889-95

    Foster, William G. Jr., 1976-84

    Fralin, Horace G., 1992-93

    Fralin, W. Heywood, 1993-2000

    Fray, Mary C., 1977-85

    Freeman, Robert L. Jr., 2004-08

    Fulton, B. Keith (B.K.), 2012-16

    Furr, G. L., 1954-62**

    Garvin, Clifton C. Jr., 1988-96**

    Giacco, Alexander F., 1979-87**

    Gibbs, Mrs. Mavis M., 1963-71

    Gilmer, Vera, 1953-61

    Givens, J. Edwin, 1968-76

    Goode, John, 1872-75

    Goodykoontz, Robert O., 1968-76

    Gordon, Charles O., 1976-84**

    Graham, Jouette, 1961-64

    Graves, S. H., 1893-95

    Green, Duff, 1881-82

    Grey, Robert J. Jr., 1987-94

    Grimsley, D. A., 1880-81

    Hall, Sidney B., 1931-41*

    Hancock, John W. Jr., 1963-71

    Hancock, John W. Jr., 1963-71

    Harris, Greta J., 2016-20

    Harris, Dr. William A., 1912-16

    Harrison, C. S., 1880-81

    Harrison, Edwin D., 1987-91

    Hart, Harris, 1918-30*

    Harvie, Lewis E., 1872*

    Hawes, Michael M., 1990-94

    Hering, E. A., 1893-97

    Hiemenz, Ginger L., 1991-92

    Hill, Charles T. (C.T.), 2015-19

    Hill, W. D., 1900-01

    Holland, L. Bruce, 2003-09*

    Holtzman, William B., 2010-14

    Horsley, J. R., 1928-44

    Houff, Betty, 1955-58

    Howard, D. J., 1949-57*

    Hubbard, E. W., 1881-85

    Huffman, Donald W., 1994-99

    James, Anna L. 2017-21

    Jamison, Calvin D. Sr., 2008-12

    Jenkins, Joseph R., 1994-99

    Jennings, W. Pat Sr., 1991-94

    Johnson, Adger S., 1964-73

    Johnson, Donald R., 1999-2003

    Johnson, L. E., 1908-12**

    Jones, Mary Virginia, 1984-88

    Kanakia, Hemant, 2003-06

    Kazmi, Mehmood S., 2015-19

    Keiley, A. M., 1880-81

    Kent, Robert C., 1875-76

    Kirkpatrick, Benjamin F., 1910-14

    Kizer, C. G., 1905-10

    Kline, L. D., 1908-12

    Kraft, Christopher C. Jr., 1970-78

    Lampe, Margaret Marston, 1988-92

    Lancaster, Dabney S., 1941-46*

    Landis, John W., 1966-70

    Lane, Helen, 1968-77

    Lane, E. H. 1956-66

    Latham, William C., 1985-89; 1999-2003

    Lawson, John R. II, 2002-10**

    Lawson, J. W., 1875-78

    Layman, T. Rodman, 1995-99; 2001-04

    Lee, Fitzhugh, 1878-81

    Lee, John C. IV, 2012-15

    Lee, W. H. F., 1873*; 1874-78; 1886-88

    Leftwich, J. B., 1880-81

    Lester, John C. Jr., 1969-71*

    Lester, Shirley, 1978-82

    Lewis, J. Marshall, 1922-30

    Lirette, Ginger, 1991-92

    Long, Letitia A. (Tish) 2017-21

    Long, Thomas B. Jr., 1981-84*

    Lovell, John T., 1877-80

    Lowe, Sandra Stiner, 2003-11

    Lutz, Jacob A. III, 2000-08**

    Magruder, E. W., 1920-22

    Marston, Margaret S., 1988-92

    Massey, John E. 1890-98*

    Mathews, H. J., 1893-97

    Maxson, Cecil R. Jr., 1983-87; 1991-99

    Maynard, H. L., 1894-99

    McDowell, James, 1889

    McGinnis, Bernard L. Sr., 1984-88

    McKinney, P. W., 1883-87

    McMath, Albert J., 1921-23*

    Mellon, Paul, 1950-55

    Meredith, John A., 1878-81

    Miles, Waldo G., 1966-70

    Miller, G. Tyler, 1946-49*

    Miller, Michael G., 1998-2002

    Mills, Robert J. 2017-18*

    Milnes, W. P., 1877-79

    Moffett, W. Stuart, 1930-36

    Moffett, William Stuart Jr., 1952-60

    Mohler, James B., 1990-92*

    Montague, E. E., 1918-20

    Moore, Rhea F. Jr., 1982-94

    Morrissette, Joseph F., 1982-90

    Moss, R. S., 1918-43**

    Mount, William D., 1914-18

    Musgrave, J. S., 1899-1903

    Mustard, W. G., 1883-87

    Nelson, Reginald H. IV, 1995-97*

    Nininger, Edgar D., 1944-54

    Noell, Robert J., 1908-12

    Nolen, George 2005-13**

    Obenshain, Suzanne S., 2010-14

    Ott, John, 1883-87

    Page, Rosewell, 1912-13

    Pafplin, Robert B., 1971-79

    Paschall, Davis Y., 1957-60*

    Payne, A. D., 1886-88

    Payne, F. M., 1891-95

    Pedigo, Linda J., 1979-83; 1996-2000

    Pendleton, W. C., 1881-82

    Penn, John E., 1873-75

    Petera, A. Ronald, 2001-05

    Petersen, L. Chris (Chris), 2016-20

    Petrine, Deborah Leigh Martin, 2012-19**

    Powers, W. Thomas, 1976-84

    Preston, Samuel D., 1952-60

    Price, T. B., 1895-99

    Quillen, Michael, 2010-18**

    Read, Charles C., 1938-47

    Read, G. M., 1955-62

    Rector, Charles W., 1979-84

    Reed, Charles Hancock, 1949-58

     

    Rice, F. E., 1880-81

    Rice, Millard B. Jr., 1971-73*

    Rice, W. Thomas, 1961-68**

    Robertson, Thomas L., 2002-06

    Robertson, Wyndham B., 1899-1908

    Robinson, Katherine, 1971-79

    Robinson, Rose Miles, 1988-96

    Robinson, Wayne H., 2014-18

    Rocovich, John G., 1997-2005; 2010-14**

    Rocovich, Sue Ellen B., 1989-97

    Rogers, Paul W. Jr., 2009-14*

    Ross, J. D. H., 1886-90

    Rowe, C. Eugene, 1968-76**

    Ruffner, William H., 1872-82*

    Russell, R. A., 1926-50

    Rust, Thomas D., 1996-2002

    Russell, Robert E., 1973-81

    Ryan, J. F., 1899-1903

    Ryan, J. Thomas, 2013-17

    St. Clair, Payton F., 1906-14

    Sanders, Paul D., 1955-63

    Sanghani, Mehul P., 2014-18

    Scruggs, Langhorne, 1880-81

    Selden, B. R., 1899-1901

    Severt, James W. Sr., 2003-11

    Sgro, Beverly, 1999-2003

    Shackleford, W. C., 1913-22

    Showalter, Jean, 1959-68

    Simmon, S. Dallas, 1982-83

    Slater, L. A., 1881-85

    Smith, Bruce B., 2002-03

    Smith, H. M. Jr., 1906-10; 1912-20

    Smith, James R., 2006-10

    Smith, J. P., 1874-77

    Smith, Mary Phlegar, 1944-53

    Smith, Oscar F. III, 1954-62

    Smith, Roy R., 1971-78

    Southall, James W., 1898-1906*

    Sproul, W. W., 1924-37*; 1937-41

    Staples, Waller R., 1886-88**

    Stearnes, R. C., 1913-18*

    Stuart, Harry, 1945-51

    Stuart, William A., 1872-74

    Sturgis, Steve, 2013-17*

    Sullins, David, 1877-80

    Sutherlin, William T., 1872-73

    Tait, Lee C., 1976-84**

    Taliaferro, W. B., 1876-79

    Taylor, James C., 1872*; 1881-86**

    Taylor, Noel C., 1996-98

    Terrell, Roxene, 1998-99

    Thomas, Joseph W., 1893-97

    Thompson, Philip S., 2000-08

    Thornhill, A. B., 1918-22

    Tidball, E. M., 1873-74

    Tilley, William J. Jr., 1982

    Treacy, Dennis H., 2012-2020**

    Tucker, James F., 1974-82

    Turnbull, N. S., 1886-91

    Turner, Joseph A., 1912-20

    Turner, James E. Jr., 1994-2002**

    Tyler, J. Hoge, 1887-90**

    Tyssowski, John, 1956-60

    Valeiras, Horacio A., 2014-18

    Vawter, Charles E., 1886-99**

    Veatch, Jeff E.,  2016-20

    Venable, A. R. Jr., 1888-93

    Wagner, Lori L., 2006-10

    Walker, Gilbert C., 1872*

    Walton, Mrs. H. H., 1944-55

    Wampler, Charles W., 1942-59*

    Wampler, Charles W. Jr., 1965-69*

    Wampler, Joseph W., 2001-2003*

    Wampler, William C., 1978-82

    Ward, G. Truman, 1984-87

    Watkins, J. B., 1903-08; 1912-28**

    Watts, Robert B., 1920-24

    Webb, L. W., 1942-52

    Wharton, Gabriel C., 1874-77**

    White, W. S. “Pete” Jr., 1981-89**

    Whitehurst, James L., 1970-74

    Wilhelm, Mrs. Jane G., 1961-68

    Wilkerson, Woodrow W., 1960-68*

    Will, Erwin H., 1958-66

    Willcox, Bolling, 1883-87

    Williams, J. H., 1881-83

    Williams, Wyatt A., 1962-70

    Wine, William E., 1943-54**

    Wood, T. Gilbert, 1922-30

    Woods, J. P., 1924-48**

    Woods, Micajah, 1911

    Wright, T. Judson, 1924-28

    Wyatt, Harry C., 1962-70**

    Yates, Charlie L., 1983-86; 1986-87

    Yates, Mrs. E. Floyd (Mary), 1955-63

     

  • Members ( by year )

    • 1872

      Rector

      Harvey Black, M.D.

      Ex-Officio

      His Excellency, G. C. Walker, Governor of Virginia

      Hon. J. C. Taylor, Attorney General

      Rev. W. H. Ruffner, D. D., Sup't of Public Instruction

      Gen. W. H. F. Lee, President State Agricultural Society

      Appointed by the Governor for Three Years

      Gen. J. R. Anderson, Richmond

      Hon. John Goode, Jr., Norfolk

      Col. John E. Penn, Patrick

      Appointed by the Governor for Two Years

      Robert Beverley, Esq. Fauquier

      W. A. Stuart, Esq. Smythe

      E. M. Tidball, Esq. Frederick

      Appointed by the Governor for One Year

      Harvey Black, M.D., Montgomery

      Hon. D. C. DeJarnette, Caroline

      Maj. W.T. Sutherlin, Pittsylvania

      Secretary

      V. E. Shepherd

       

    • 1881

      Rector

      Honorable James C. Taylor

      Ex-Officio

      Honorable R. R. Farr,Superintendent Public Instruction

      General Members

      Andrew Broaddus, Esq., Page

      W. E. Hubbard, Esq., Buckingham

      Dr. L. A. Slater, New Kent

      Honorable J. C. Taylor, Montgomery

      Honorable C. H. Bliss, Prince Edward

      Honorable Duff Green, Stafford

      W. C. Pendleton, Esq., Smyth

      General J. H. Williams, Frederick

       

    • 1887

      Rector

      J. Hoge Tyler, Belle Hampton, Pulaski Co.

      (Term expires January 1st, 1892.)

      Ex-Officio

      Dr. John L. Buchanan, Superintendent Public Instruction, Richmond

      General Members

      Honorable Waller R. Staples, Christiansburg

      C. E. Vawter, Esq., Crozet, Albemarle County

      Colonel J. H. D. Ross, Lexington, Rockbridge County

      Captain A. D. Payne, Warrenton, Fauquier County (Terms expire January 1st, 1890.)

      N. S. Turnbull, Esq., Lawrenceville, Brunswick County

      Dr. John W. Lawson, Smithfield, Isle of Wight County

      Jos. M. Barton, Esq., Winchester, Frederick County

       

    • 1942

      Members of the V.P.I. board of visitors, which met yesterday in a called session to draw up resolutions in an effort to correct certain conditions at the college, are pictured here together with Governor Colgate W. Darden, Jr., who met with the board. Left to right, above, are: first row, Col. James P. Woods, Roanoke Charles W. Wampler, Harrisonburg, president of the state board of agriculture and immigration; Governor Darden, Dr. Julian A. Burruss, president of V.P.I.; former Governor Westmoreland Davis, Leesburg; Allen T. Eskridge, Pulaski ; second row, Robert S. Moss, Burke's Garden; Robert A. Russell, Rustburg; Charles C. Reed, Richmond; J.R. Horsley, Appomattox; J. B. Fogleman, secretary of the board and treasurer of the college; and Dr. Dabney Lancaster, state superintendent of instruction. (Times Staff Photo) Roanoke Times, August 18, 1942.

    • 1944

      The Board of Visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute who on Tuesday, June 27, assumed the administrative control of the Radford College which under the acts of its consolidation with the Virginia Polytechnic Institute became the Woman's Division of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. There was a full attendance of the board at the meeting on Tuesday, including the four women recently appointed by Governor Darden to the board. They are left to right: Dr. Dabney S. Lancaster, state superintendent of public instruction, Richmond; V. G. Eberwine, Suffolk; Charles W. Wampler, Harrisonburg; Colonel James F. Woods, rector of the board, Roanoke; Dr. Phlegar Smith, Hollins College, Hollins; Mrs. R. L. McConnell, Radford; Dr. Julian A. Burruss, Blacksburg; L. W. Webb, Norfolk; W. E. Wine, Parker; Dr. D. W. Peters, Radford; Mrs. H. H. Walton, Frederick Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. Boatwright, Coeburn; E. D. Nininger, Roanoke; Robert A. Russell, Rustburg; J. B. Fogleman, Blacksburg; Charles C. Reed, Richmond; and Allen T. Eskridge, Pulaski.

       

      (Photo by Kent Studio) Roanoke Times, July 2, 1944.

       

    • 1954

      The Virginia Tech Board of Visitors met at Blacksburg yesterday for its annual meeting. Shown (left to right, front row): Mrs. H. H. Walton, Fredericks Hall; Miss Mary Fred Claytor, Bedford; Mrs. R. L. McConnell, Radford; Mrs. Turner A. Gilmer, Lebanon; Mrs. Elva DeLaBarre , Blacksburg, clerk of the board; (back row): Charles W. Wampler, Harrisonburg; W. S. Moffett Jr., Staunton; F. L. Furr, Roanoke; Samuel D. Preston, Winchester; Oscar H. Smith III, Norfolk; Charles H. Reed, Chesterfield; Granville M. Read, Forest; W. H. Burruss, Lynchburg; Vernon G. Eberwine, Suffolk. Eberwine was re-elected rector at the meeting. Elected to the executive committee with Eberwine were Furr, Moffett, Mrs. McConnell and Reed. Paul Mellon of Upperville and Dowell J. Howard, state superintendent of public instruction, were unable to attend the meeting.

       

    • 1972

    • 1980

      Front row ( left to right):

      James F. Tucker, W. E. Lavery, Parke C. Binkley (rector), Margie W. Thomas (secretary), Charles W. Rector

       

      Back row (left to right):

       

      Charles Gordon (vice-rector), Lee C. Tait, William C. Wampler, Mrs. Edsel H. Lester, Ms. Linda J. Pedigo, William G. Foster, Robert E. Russell, James F. Brownell, Mrs. Jackson L. Fray, W. Thomas Powers, Alexander Giacco

    • 1984

      Seated (left to right):

      Mary Fray, Rhea F. Moore, Jr., William E. Lavery (President), Alexander F. Giacco (Rector), Thomas B. Long, Jr., G. Truman Ward

       

      Standing (left to right):

       

      Mary Howe diZerega, Daniel T. Goulson (student), William C. Cranwell, Cecil R. Maxson, Jr., Bernard L. McGinnis, Mary Virginia Jones, Robert B. Claytor, Charles L. Yates, Joseph F. Morrissette, W.S. "Pete" White, Jr.

    • 1987

      Seated (left to right):

      Mary Virginia Jones, Robert B. Claytor, W.S. "Pete" White, Jr. (Rector), William E. Lavery (President), Mary Fray

       

      Standing (left to right):

       

      Robert J. Gray, Jr., William C. Latham, William G. Broaddus, Bernard L. McGinnis, Clifford A. Cutchins, Rhea F. Moore, Jr., Carol Irvine, Champ Clark, Joseph F. Morrissette, Edwin D. Harrison

       

    • 1997 - 1998

      Front Row:

      Rodman Layman, Susan Phillips Bari, Joseph Jenkins (Vice Rector), James Turner (Rector), Paul Torgersen (President), Donald Huffman, Noel Taylor

       

      Row 2:

       

      Ellsworth "Skip" Furman (Faculty Representative), Krista Johnston (Undergraduate Student Representative), Linda Pedigo, Cecil Maxson, John Rocovich, Heywood Fralin, Robert Delano, Thomas Rust, Mitchell Carr, Michael Herndon (Graduate Student Representative)

       

    • 1998 - 1999

      Front row (left to right):

      Cecil R. Maxson, Jr.; T. Rodman Layman; Susan Phillips Bari; Joseph R. Jenkins - Vice Rector; James E. Turner, Jr. - Rector; Paul E. Torgersen - President; Linda J. Pedigo; Roxene Thompson - Graduate Student Representative; Thomas D. Rust

       

      Back row (left to right):

      Drew Bishop - Undergraduate Student Representative; Bennie J. Etheridge; Noel C. Taylor; John G. Rocovich, Jr.; W. Heywood Fralin; Gary P. Clisham; Donald W. Huffman; Michael G. Miller

       

      Not pictured: Kerry J. Redican - Faculty Representative

       

    • 1999 - 2000

      Back Row:

      Noel C Taylor, Micheal G Miller, Ritchard K. Bambach, Bennie J. Etheridge

       

      Middle Row:

      Donald R. Johnson, John G Rocovich, Jr., W. Heywood Fralin, Gary P. Clisham, Donald W. Huffman, Thomas D. Rust

       

      Front Row:

      Elaine Humphrey, Paul Torgersen, James E Turner, Jr., Linda J. Pedigo, Willaiam C. Latham

       

    • 2000 - 2001

      Back Row:

      Jacob A. Lutz III, Bennie J. Etheridge, Donald R. Johnson, Donald W. Huffman, Willaiam C. Latham, John G Rocovich, Jr.

       

      Middle Row:

      Sarah Airey, Philip S. Thompson, Stephanie Scheer, Beverly Sgro, Michael G. Miller

       

      Front Row:

      Mitzi R. Vernon, James E. Turner, Charles Steger - President, Thomas D. Rust, Susan P. Bari

       

    • 2001 - 2002

      Front Row:

      Beverly H. Sgro, James E. Turner, Charles W. Steger - President, Thomas D. Rust*

       

      Middle Row:

      Mitchell O. Carr, Joseph Wampler, Jacob A. Lutz III, John G. Rocovich, Jr., Donald R. Johnson, Donald W. Huffman

       

      Back Row:

      L. Leon Geyer, Philip S. Thompson, Michael G. Miller, James Disney, Gunnar Lucko, William C. Latham,

       

      *Note: Rust resigned from the BOV in mid-year after winning election to the Virginia House of Delegates. He was replaced by T. Rodman Layman

       

    • 2002 - 2003

      Front Row (left to right):

      Beverly Sgro, William C. Latham - Vice Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, John C. Rocovich, Jr. - Rector, Donald R. Johnson

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Brian Montgomery - Undergraduate Student Representative, Edd Sewell - Faculty Representative, Joseph W. Wampler, Jacob A. Lutz III, Ben J. Davenport, Jr., Mitchell O. Carr

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      T. Rodman Layman, John R. Lawson II, Christian Rieser - Graduate Student Representative, Philip S. Thompson

       

      Not pictured: Ronald A. Petera, Thomas L. Robertson, Bruce B. Smith

    • 2003 - 2004

      Front Row (left to right):

      Sandra Stiner Lowe, Ben J. Davenport, Jr. - Vice Rector, Charles W. Steger, John G. Rocovich, Jr. - Rector, Diane L. Zahm - Faculty Representative

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Michael Anzilotti, T. Rodman Layman, Jacob A. Lutz III, Philip S. Thompson, Myrna Callison - Graduate Student Representative, James W. Severt, Sr.

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      L. Bruce Holland, Mitchell O. Carr, John R. Lawson II, Thomas L. Robertson, Hemant Kanakia, A. Ronald Petera, Allan J. Bradley

    • 2004 - 2005

      Front Row (left to right):

      Beverly Dalton, Ben J. Davenport, Jr. - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, Jacob A. Lutz III, John R. Lawson II

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Melinda R. Cep - Undergraduate Student Representative, James W. Severt, Sr., Marcus C. Ly - Graduate Student Representative, Hemant Kanakia

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Robert L. Freeman, L. Bruce Holland, Thomas L. Robertson, Michael Anzilotti, John G. Rocovich Jr., Philip S. Thompson

       

      (Not pictured:)

      W. Samuel Easterling - Faculty Senate Representative, Sandra Stiner Lowe, A. Ronald Petera

       

    • 2005 - 2006

      Front Row:

      James W. Severt, Sr., Ben J. Davenport, Jr. - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, Jacob A. Lutz III, Michele L. Duke

       

      Middle Row:

      Robert L. Freeman, Jennifer Jessie - Undergraduate Student Representative, Susanna Rinehart - Faculty Senate Representative, George Nolen, John R. Lawson II, L. Bruce Holland, Sandra Stiner Lowe

       

      Back Row:

      Beverley Dalton, Navin Manjooran - Graduate Student Representative, Michael Anzilotti, Hemant Kanakia, Philip S. Thompson, Thomas L. Robertson

    • 2006 - 2007

      Front Row (left to right):

      Sandra Stiner Lowe, Jacob A. Lutz III - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, John R. Lawson II - Vice Rector, Michele L. Duke

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Gregory Sagstetter - Undergraduate Student Representative, James R. Smith, James W. Severt, Sr., Ben J. Davenport, Jr., Robert L. Freeman, Lori L. Wagner, Kerry Redican - Faculty Senate Representative

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Ennis McCrery - Graduate Student Representative, Beverley Dalton, Michael Anzilotti, L. Bruce Holland, Philip S. Thompson, George Nolen

       

      Not pictured: Jean Brickey

       

    • 2007 - 2008

      Front Row (left to right)::

      Sandra Stiner Lowe, Jacob A. Lutz III - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, John R. Lawson II - Vice Rector, Michelle L. Duke

       

      Middle Row (left to right)::

      James R. Smith, L. Bruce Holland, Ben J. Davenport, Jr., Robert L. Freeman, Jr., George Nolen, Beverley Dalton Back Row (left to right)::

      Judy U. Alford - Staff Representative, Lori L. Wagner, Brennan E. Shepard - Graduate Student Representative, Michael Anzilotti, Philip S. Thompson, Kerry J. Redican - Faculty Representative, Ryan C. Smith - Undergraduate Student Representative

       

      Not pictured: James W. Severt, Sr.

       

    • 2008 - 2009

      Front Row (left to right):

      Sandra Stiner Lowe, Beverley Dalton, John R. Lawson II - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, George Nolen - Vice Rector, Michele L. Duke

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Douglas R. Fahl, L. Bruce Holland, Ben J. Davenport Jr., Michael Anzilotti, James W. Severt, Sr., James R. Smith, Frederick J. Cobb

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Arlane Gordon-Bray - Undergraduate Student Representative, Linsey M. Barker - Graduate Student Representative, Lori L. Wagner, Thomas L. Tucker - Staff Representative, Hardus Odendaal - Faculty Representative, Calvin D. Jamison

       

    • 2009 - 2010

      Gary Long - Faculty Representative, Sandra Stiner Lowe, John R. Lawson II - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, George Nolen - Vice Rector, Michele L. Duke

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Kristina Hartman - Undergraduate Student Representative, Rebecca French - Graduate Student Representative, Douglas R. Fahl, James W. Severt Sr., Lori L. Wagner, Frederick J. Cobb, Beverly Dalton

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Paul W. Rogers, James R. Smith, Ben J. Davenport Jr., Calvin D. Jamison, Michael Anzilotti, Thomas L. Tucker

       

    • 2010 - 2011

      Front Row (left to right):

      Douglas "Doug" R. Fahl, Michele "Shelley" L. Duke - Vice Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, George Nolen - Rector, Sandra Stiner Lowe, Suzanne Obenshain

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Maxine Lyons - Staff Representative, Michael Ellerbrock - Faculty Representative, Beverley Dalton, Calvin D. Jamison, Sr., Michael J. Quillen

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Shane McCarty - Undergraduate Student Representative, Paul W. Rogers, Jr., John G. Rocovich, Jr., Deepu George - Graduate Student Representative, Michael Anzilotti, Frederick "Freddy" J. Cobb

       

      Not Pictured: William B. Holtzman and James W. Severt, Sr

    • 2011 - 2012

      Front Row (left to right):

      Suzanne Obenshain, George Nolen - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, Frederick "Freddy" J. Cobb, Deborah L. Petrine

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Douglas "Doug" R. Fahl; Maxine Lyons - Staff Representative; Calvin D. Jamison, Sr.; Beverley Dalton; Michael J. Quillen; Michelle McLeese - Graduate Student Representative

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Bruce Pencek - Faculty Representative; Cordel L. Faulk; John C. Lee, IV; John G. Rocovich, Jr.; William B. Holtzman; Paul W. Rogers, Jr.; Matthew Banfield - Undergraduate Student Representative

       

      Not Pictured: Michele "Shelley" L. Duke - Vice Rector

       

    • 2012 - 2013

      Front Row (left to right):

      Suzanne Obenshain, Michael J. Quillen - Rector, Charles W. Steger - President, George Nolen - Vice Rector, Nancy V. Dye, M.D.

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Sarah M. Karpanty - Faculty Representative; Robyn T. Jones - Graduate Student Representative; Cordel L. Faulk; Paul W. Rogers, Jr.; Sue A. Teel - Staff Representative; Deborah L. Petrine

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      B. Keith "B. K." Fulton; Dennis H. Treacy; John C. Lee, IV; William B. Holtzman; John G. Rocovich, Jr.; Nicholas A. Onopa - Undergraduate Student Representative; William D. "Bill" Fairchild, III

       

      Not Pictured: Michele "Shelley" L. Duke - Vice Rector

    • 2013 - 2014

      Front Row (left to right):

      Suzanne Obenshain; Michael J. Quillen - Rector; Charles W. Steger - President; Deborah L. Petrine - Vice Rector; Cordel L. Faulk

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Nancy V. Dye, M.D.; William B. Holtzman; John C. Lee, IV; John G. Rocovich, Jr.; J. Thomas Ryan, M.D.; Nick Warrington - Graduate Student Representative

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Joe Merola - Faculty Representative; Erica Wood - Undergraduate Student Representative; William D. "Bill" Fairchild, III; Steve Sturgis; James L. Chapman, IV; B. Keith "B. K." Fulton; Sue A. Teel - Staff Representative

       

      Not Pictured: Dennis H. Treacy

    • 2014 - 2015

      Front Row (left to right):

      Cordel L. Faulk; Ashley Francis - Graduate Student Representative; Deborah L. Petrine - Rector; Timothy D. Sands - President; James L. Chapman IV - Vice Rector; William D. "Bill" Fairchild III

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Walter D. "Dan" Cook III - Staff Representative; Austin Larrowe - Undergraduate Student Representative; Mehul P. Sanghani; Bernice L. Hausman - Faculty Representative; Keith "B. K." Fulton; Steve Sturgis; Michael J. Quillen

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Dennis H. Treacy; John C. Lee IV; Wayne H. Robinson; Horacio A. Valeiras; Nancy V. Dye, M.D.; J. Thomas Ryan, M.D.

    • 2015 - 2016

      Jim Stroup photo

      Front Row (left to right):

      William D. "Bill" Fairchild III; Deborah L. Petrine - Rector; Timothy D. Sands - President; James L. Chapman IV - Vice Rector; Michael J. Quillen

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Walter D. "Dan" Cook III - Staff Representative; Mehmood S. Kazmi; Keith "B. K." Fulton; Charles T. "C. T." Hill; Morgan Sykes - Undergraduate Student Representative; Mohammed S. Seyam - Graduate Student Representative

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Horacio A. Valeiras; Dennis H. Treacy; Nancy V. Dye, M.D.; Rami A. Dalloul - Faculty Representative; Steve Sturgis; J. Thomas Ryan, M.D.; Wayne H. Robinson;

       

      Not Pictured: Mehul P. Sanghani

       

    • 2016 - 2017

      Front Row (left to right):

      Deborah L. Petrine; Dennis H. Treacy - Vice-Rector; Timothy D. Sands - President; James L. Chapman IV - Rector; Greta J. Harris

       

      Middle Row (left to right):

      Mehmood S. Kazmi; Mehul P. Sanghani; Montasir M. Abbas - Faculty Representative; L. Chris Petersen; Tara Reel - Graduate Student Representative; Gabriel Cohen - Undergraduate Student Representative

       

      Back Row (left to right):

      Alex B. Parrish - Staff Representative; Charles T. "C. T." Hill; Steve Sturgis; Thanassis Rikakis - Executive Vice President and Provost; Jeffrey E. Veatch; J. Thomas Ryan; Michael J. Quillen; Wayne H. Robinson

       

      Not Pictured: Horacio A. Valeiras

  • Constituent Representatives ( alphabetical )

    All members of the board of visitors are listed below through 2017 appointments,

    along with their years of service on the board. Special designations, if any, are noted as follows:

     

     u=Undergraduate student  |  g=Graduate student   |   f=Faculty   |   s=Staff

    Abbas, Montasir M. (Monty), 2016-17 f

    Airey, Sarah, 2000-01 u

    Alford, Judy, 2007-08 s

    Bambach, Richard K., 1999-2000 f

    Banfield, Matthew, 2011-12 u

    Barker, Linsey M., 2008-09 g

    Beck, Tracey, 1986-87 u

    Bishop, Andrew, 1998-99 u

    Bradley, Allan, 2003-04 u

    Brickey, Jean, 2006-07 s

    Bunin, J. Christopher, 1996-97 g

    Callison, Myrna, 2003-04 g

    Cep, Melinda, 2004-05 u

    Cohen, Gabriel (Gabe), 2016-17 u

    Conn, David, 1988-89 f

    Cook III, Walter D. (Dan), 2014-16 s

    Dale, Todd Dwight, 1985-86 u

    Dalloul, Rami A., 2015-16 f

    De Wolf, David, 1993-94 f

    Disney, James, 2001-02 u

    Dotti, Sarah B., 1995-96 u

    Easterling, W. Samuel, 2004-05 f

    Ellerbrock, Mike, 2010-11 f

    Eng, Ludeman, 1990-91 f

    Eustis, Joanne D., 1988 f

    Francis, S. Ashley, 2014-15 g

    French, Rebecca, 2009-10 g

    Fuhrman, Ellsworth R., 1997-98 f

    George, Deepu, 2010-11 g

    Geyer, Leon, 1992 (spring); 1992-93; 2001-02 f

    Glatz, Leslie E., 1988-89 u

    Gordon-Bray, Arlane, 2008-09 u

    Goulson, Daniel T., 1984-85 u

    Hartman, Kristina, 2009-10 u

     

    Hausman, Bernice, 2014-15 f

    Heil, Katherine E., 1990-91 u

    Heimenz, Ginger, 1991-92 u

    Herndon, Michael, 1997-98 g

    Hillison, John, 1991 (fall) f

    Humphrey, Elaine, 1999-2000 g

    Irvine, Carol, 1987-88 u

    Jessie, Jennifer, 2005-06 u

    Johnston, Krista L., 1997-98 u

    Jones, Robyn, 2012-13 g

    Karpanty, Sarah, 2012-13 f

    Larrowe, Austin, 2014-15 u

    Leclaire, Kevin W., 1994-95 u

    Long, Gary, 2009-10 f

    Lucko, Gunnar, 2001-02 g

    Ly, Marcus C., 2004-05 g

    Lyons, Maxine, 2010-12 s

    Manjooran, Navin, 2005-06 g

    McCarty, Shane, 2010-11 u

    McCrery, Ennis, 2006-07 g

    McLeese, Michelle, 2011-12 g

    Merola, Joseph, 2013-14 f

    Metz, Paul, 1996-97 f

    Montgomery, Brian, 2002-03 u

    Morgan, Robert S., 1992-93 u

    Moser, Robert D., 1996-97 u

    Netto, Brett 2017-18 g

    Odendaal, Hardus, 2008-09 f

    Oduyoye, Darin O., 1999-2000 u

    Olusina, Seyi 2017-18 u

    Onopa, Nicholas, 2012-13 u

    Parrish, Alex, 2016-17 s

    Pencek, Bruce, 2011-12 f

    Redican, Kerry J., 1998-99; 2006-07; 2007-08 f

     

    Reel, Tara D.,  2016-17 g

    Rieser, Christian, 2002-03 g

    Rinehart, Susanna C., 2005-06 f

    Robinson, Hans 2017-18 f

    Sagstetter, Gregory J., 2006-07 u

    Scanlon, Patrick, 1989-90 f

    Scheer, Stephanie, 2000-01 g

    Sebek, Robert 2017-18 s

    Sewell, Edd Jr., 2002-03 f

    Seyam, Mohammed, 2015-16 g

    Shepard, Brennan, 2007- 08 g

    Sherman, Thomas M., 1995-96 f

    Shumsky, N. Larry, 1994-95 f

    Singleton, Alan C., 1989-90 u

    Smith, Ryan C., 2007-08 u

    Stroh, James E., 1983-84 u

    Sykes, Morgan, 2015-16 u

    Teel, Sue, 2012-14 s

    Thompson, Roxene M., 1998-99 g

    Trexler, Scott E., 1993-94 u

    Tucker, Thomas L., 2008-09 s

    Vernon, Mitzi R., 2000-01 f

    Waddill, Dan W., 1995-96 g

    Warrington, Nick, 2013-14 g

    Wood, Erica, 2013-14 u

    Zahm, Diane L., 2003-04 f

© 2017 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

  • Rectors

    Governor Gilbert C. Walker appointed the first board of visitors (BOV) on March 19, 1872, the same day he signed the bill establishing the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College. The board, comprised of 10 members, held its first meeting in Richmond the following March 25-26, 1872. In 1873, the legislature instituted staggered terms for board members

     

    The composition of the board has changed from time to time over the years. When the board was first appointed in 1872, Gov. Gilbert C. Walker stipulated that ex officio members would include the president of the Virginia State Agricultural Society, members of the State Board of Education, and him. Today, the president of the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services is the only ex officio member. In 1982 the General Assembly approved the appointment of students to governing bodies of state colleges and universities, and in 1983 the first non-voting undergraduate student, James E. Stroh, joined the Virginia Tech board. The BOV began allowing the president of Faculty Senate to sit with the board in open sessions in 1988, with Joanne D. Eustis the first to fill that capacity. In 1995 the first graduate student, Dan W. Waddill, joined the board as a non-voting member. In 2006 the board amended its by-laws to add the president of the Staff Senate as a member, and Jean Brickey became the first classified staff representative. Like the undergraduate and graduate student representatives, faculty and staff representatives have no voting privileges.

     

    The chair of the board of visitors is called the rector. Rectors have been as follows (click on a name to read a brief bio of each person):

    • 1872-75 Dr. Harvey Black

      Harvey Black served on the board of visitors from 1872 to 1876 and was rector from 1872 to 1875.

       

      Black served as one of Lt. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's surgeons, and participated in the amputation of the general's arm following the battle of Chancellorsville. Following the war, Black, served as president of the board of trustees of the Preston and Olin Institute and was among those influencing the decision to locate the new land grant institution that would become Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.

       

      The first board of visitors of the fledgling institution was named by Gov. Gilbert Walker in 1872, taking office immediately. Among the members of the board were Black, who became the first Rector of the board; Joseph R. Anderson; William A. Stuart of Smythe and Wythe counties; John Penn of Patrick County; William T. Sutherlin, a native of Danville; Joseph Cloyd of Pulaski County; and Lewis E. Harvie, of Amelia County.

       

      (From "Confederates in the Collegium: The Influence of J.E.B. Stuart's Leadership on the Development of Virginia Tech")

    • 1875-77 Gen. G. C. Wharton

      Gen. Gabriel C. Wharton served on the board of visitors from 1874 to 1877 and was rector from 1875 to 1877.

       

      Wharton was born July 23, 1824 in Culpepper County, Va., the son of John Redd Wharton and Eliza Hansbrough Colvin Wharton. He enrolled at VMI on Sept. 1, 1845; was graduated July 5, 1847, standing second in a class of 12 (distinguished graduate). During the Civil War, he commanded the 51st Virginia Infantry (1861) and after promotion to brigadier general in 1863, was a division commander in the second corps of the Army of Northern Virginia.

       

      He married Ann Rebecca "Nannie" Radford, a daughter of Dr. John B. Radford (after whose family the city of Radford, Va., is named) and Elizabeth Radford. He was involved in the development of the New River Railroad, Mining, and Manufacturing Co., which was attempting to build a railroad line from Radford to the coal fields of southern West Virginia. In 1871, he was elected to the Legislature and served several terms in the General Assembly. He died May 12, 1906, in Radford.

    • 1877-80 William Eggleston

      William Eggleston served on the board of visitors from 1876 to 1879 and was rector from 1877 to 1880.

       

      At the start of the Civil War, the 24th Virginia Infantry Regiment was assembled in June 1861 with men from Floyd, Franklin, Carroll, Giles, Pulaski, Mercer, and Henry counties. Giles County contributed the New River Rifles to the 24th Virginia as Company F, and Eggleston was elected captain.

       

      Eggleston was elected in 1861 to the House of Delegates and served through 1863.

       

      After the war, he returned to Giles County and moved to Chapman's resort at the Palisades on the New River. In 1867, Eggleston took over and changed the name to Eggleston Springs.

       

      Eggleston looked to improve transportation in the region. In July 1870, the Virginia General Assembly incorporated the New River White Sulphur Springs Turnpike Company and granted it authority sell stock. Once enough funds were raised, the company was authorized to construct a road from the New River railroad bridge on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad (now Norfolk Southern's crossing at Radford) to White Sulphur Springs in Giles County.

       

      Eggleston was involved with his fellow board member, Gen. Gabriel C. Wharton, and other prominent New River Valley residents in the development of The New River Railroad, Mining, and Manufacturing Company, which was attempting to build a railroad line from Radford to the coal fields of southern West Virginia, when it obtained a charter in March of 1872.

    • 1880-81 R. P. Carson

      Robert P. Carson served on the board of visitors from 1880 to 1881 and was rector from 1880 to 1881.

       

      Carson was born to Joseph and Jane Carson on July 10, 1832, in Washington County, Va. In 1849, he went to the Abingdon Male Academy, then in 1851, he went to Virginia Military Institute and was graduated in 1854.

       

      In 1861, Carson, the a captain, headed the Glade Springs Rifles in Washington County. When the 37th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment was organized there in May 1861, Carson was named a lieutenant colonel in the regiment.

       

      Following the war, from 1865 to 1871, he was the principal of the Abingdon Academy. He went on to become the superintent of schools for Washington County. He died in 1924.

    • 1882-86 James C. Taylor

      James C. Taylor served on the board of visitors in 1872 as an ex-officio member and from 1881 to 1886 and was rector from 1882 to 1886.

       

      Taylor, from Christiansburg, was the attorney general for the commonwealth, and as such was a member of the State Board of Education, all of whom were to serve as ex officio members of the initial board of visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College.

       

      Taylor, born in Christiansburg, Va., on Sept. 23, 1826, was the son of Creed Taylor and Mary Craig, who was a daughter of early and prominent settlers in Montgomery County. In Christiansburg on Dec. 24, 1851, he married Kate R. Wade, daughter of William and Rebecca (Crow) Wade.

       

      Taylor served his country in two wars. He was a captain in the state militia, under Govs. Letcher and Wise, and was one of Montgomery County’s volunteers in the Mexican war, as was his brother George. Their company was commanded by Capt. James F. Preston, and the regiment served in Mexico under Gen. Zachary Taylor. Taylor was one of five brothers to enter the service in the Civil War: George, John, Creed, and Robert served with him. He was a captain, then major in the 54th Virginia Infantry.

       

      After the war, Taylor read law with Preston & Staples and was admitted to the bar in October 1850. He practiced in the state courts from the justice of the peace to the supreme court of appeals and in the national courts from district court to the supreme court of the United States. He was a member of the Virginia senate from 1863 to 1865; was attorney general from1869 to 1874; and was member of the house of delegates from 1881 to 1883.

       

      He died in 1887 and is buried in Christiansburg.

    • 1886-87 Waller R. Staples

      Waller Redd Staples served on the board of visitors from 1886 to 1888 and was rector from 1886 to 1887. He was appointed to the board by Gov. Fitzhugh Lee on Jan. 1, 1886, and elected rector by the board on Jan. 23, 1886.

       

      Staples of Christiansburg was a judge on the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

       

      He was born in Patrick County on Feb. 24, 1826. He studied at the University of North Carolina for two years, then entered the College of William and Mary, graduating in 1845. He moved to Montgomery County, Va., where he began the practice of law in the office of the Hon. William Ballard Preston. In 1853-54, he was a member of the state legislature. He was one of the four delegates sent by the Virginia convention of 1861 to represent the state in the Confederate provisional congress at Montgomery, Ala., until Feb. 22, 1862. On that day, the new Confederate congress came into existence, and Staples became a member of its house of representatives. He was re-elected in 1863 and served until the end of the war. He returned to his law practice in Montgomery County.

       

      In February 1870, he was elected to the Supreme Court of Appeals, serving until 1882 when the Readjuster party came into control of the state. Staples and his associates on the bench were not re-elected. In 1884, Staples was a member of the committee chosen to revise the civil and criminal laws of the state, resulting in the "Code of Virginia of 1887."

       

      He served as president of the Virginia Bar Association from 1893 to 1894.

       

      He died Aug. 20, 1897, in Christiansburg and is buried in Fair View Cemetery in Roanoke.

    • 1887-89 J. Hoge Tyler

      James Hoge Tyler served on the board of visitors from 1887 to 1890 and was rector from 1887 to 1889.

       

      Tyler, Virginia governor from 1898 to 1902, was born at the Tyler family farm, called Blenheim, in Caroline County, Va., on Aug. 11, 1846. He was the son of George Tyler (1817-1889), who was a representative of Caroline County, and Eliza Hoge (1815-1846), the daughter of Gen. James Hoge. His mother having died during his birth, the young Tyler was reared by his grandparents, James and Eleanor Howe Hoge at Hayfield, their Pulaski County, Va., home. Tyler was educated in Pulaski County before attending the school of Franklin Minor in Albermarle County, Va.

       

      Tyler left school at the age of 16 to join the Confederate army and served as a private in the Signal Corps throughout the Civil War. (His later rank of "major" was apparently a post-war honorific.) After the war, Tyler returned to Pulaski County, where he had inherited the Hoge farm. He would rename the farm Belle Hampton and become a successful farmer, raising Durham cattle and serving as president of the Virginia Stock Farmers' Institute and of the Southwest Virginia Live Stock Association. His other business interests would come to include a store, a gristmill, a sawmill, the Belle Hampton Coal Mining Co. (sold in 1902 to a New York company), and the Radford Development Co.

       

      Tyler married Sue Montgomery Hammet (daughter of Edward and Clementina Craig Hammet, who built the first home in what it now Radford, Va.) on Nov. 16, 1868. While living at Belle Hampton, the Tylers had eight children: Edward H., James H. Jr., Stockton H., Lucy Belle, Sue H., Henry C. "Hal," Eliza "Lily," and Eleanor Howe, who died in infancy. In 1891, the family moved to Halwick, their home in Radford.

       

      In 1877, Tyler was elected to the state senate, serving one term and advocating retrenchment and reform. He maintained an active role in civic affairs, serving on the state debt commission. He served on the board of visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College from 1887 to 1890 and served as rector from 1887 to 1889.

       

      During the 1880s, he mounted two unsuccessful congressional campaigns. Tyler also launched an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1889 but secured the second place on the Democratic ticket that year and served as lieutenant governor from 1890 to 1894. While serving as lieutenant governor, Tyler again ran for the governorship in 1893, losing to Charles T. O'Ferrall. In 1897, Tyler successfully campaigned for governor and served from 1898 to 1902.

       

      Tyler's gubernatorial administration was marked by a concern with adjustment of Virginia's state debt. He was a strong supporter of bi-metallism, and was a personal friend of William Jennings Bryan. The American Historical Society's History of Virginia (1926) summarized Tyler's governorship thus: "Governor Tyler's administration was marked by the settlement of the long vexed oyster question, for it was largely through his efforts that the LeCato bill was made effective and the oyster beds of the state made to yield an income to the state instead of an annual deficit. As governor he secured the reduction of taxes and the state debt and the increase of the public school fund and the literary fund. Other measures credited to his administration are the establishment of the Farm Bureau, the reorganization of the agricultural department, a conditional pardon system and the settlement of the Virginia-Tennessee boundary question."

       

      While serving as governor, Tyler launched an unsuccessful campaign for the U. S. Senate seat of incumbent Thomas S. Martin. His unsuccessful 1899 campaign would be Tyler's last, though he would continue to be somewhat active in state politics, playing the role of elder statesman and considering various pleas that he again seek office. During World War I, he served as food administrator for Radford and Montgomery County.

       

      James Hoge Tyler died Jan. 3, 1925. Sue Hammet Tyler, born July 16, 1845, died April 24, 1927.

    • 1889-1900 Charles E. Vawter

      Charles E. Vawter served on the board of visitors from 1886 to 1900 and was rector from 1989 to 1900.

       

      Charles Erastus Vawter was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, June 9, 1841. He was the son of John H. Vawter, who was, for twenty-four years, a member or the Virginia legislature. Charles Vawter's education at Emory and Henr College was interrupted in his junior year, when he joined the Confederate army, serving in the Stonewall Brigade, in which he became a captain. He was ceptured and became a prisoner or war at Fort Delaware. He was graduated from Emory and Henry in 1866, and, in that year, married Virginia Longley. For twelve years, he was professor of mathematics at his alma mater. He served as a member of the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute, and was recognised as an authority on manual training in the south. He died in 1905.

       

      When Albemarle County received more then a million dollere from the bequest of Samuel Miller, its commissioners started a search for an industrial school, after which to pattern the one to be set up in Albemarle from the Miller Fund. No such institution could be found; so, the commissioners had to undertake an experiment without a model; to set up an example, instead of following one. A contract was entered into for the construction of the buildings, and then the commissioners began their search for a superintendent. After two days of weighting the qualifications of the various applicants, Charles E. Vawter was elected as the first superintendent of the Miller Manual Labor School. The Miller School, an institution for orphan boys and girls, established on a farm, with buildings and shops especially erected and equipped, offered him a rare opportunity to realise his ideal of a school that would train the mlnd and hand together. How well he succeeded is indicated by the fact that, in 1886, the Governor of Virginia asked him to give to the Commonwealth of Virginia the benefit of his experiences in the reorganization of the college at Blacksburg, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. On the advice of friends, and with the consent of the Miller School authorities, he accepted the offered position, and, for the next fourteen years, he devoted much labor and thought to the development of this great interest of the State. How well Captain Vawter served as a member of the Board of Visitors during the turbulent years (1886-1891), and as Rector of the Board during the golden era of the real beginning of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, may best be learned from his contemporaries:

       

      "Dr. McBryde, on the occasion of Captaln Vawter's retiring from the post of Rector: 'It would be difficult to give adequate expression to our appreciation of the valuable services you have rendered the institution and the State by your wise and able administration of the important affairs falling within the province of the board of Visitors . . Your thorough knowledge of everything pertaining to sound technical training and your uniform courtesy in the discharge of the duties attaching to the Rectorshlp have long commanded our admiration' ". (From the Bugle, vol. 6, 1900; dedicated to Captain Vawter. See pages 4-10)

       

      " . . He had great influence in promoting the development of industrial education in the public schools throughout the country. He was a member of the State Board of Education and rendered valuable service in organising the public schools of Virginia under the constitution of 1902; he served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Normal and Industrial School for girls at Farmville, Virginia, which became a State Teachers' College; he was also Chairman of the Board of the Normal and Industrial Institute for Negroes at Petersburg; and of the State Board of Charities and Corrections. For a number of years, he was Rector of the Board of Trustees of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and aided President J. B. McBryde in shaping the policies of that institution . . ." (From artlcle by C. W. Dabney in the Dictionary of American Biography, v. 19, p. 260)

       

      " . . . Captain Vawter's memorial is not dependent upon marble shaft nor brazen tablet. It is written in men's lives - lives that will perpetuate the good seed sown in the early days when manual training was not given its true measure of worth. The life of this educator shows to every energetic young man that great things not only may, but can, be accomplished, when mentel ability is accompanied by the energy to will and to do . . . " (From article Charles E. Vawter, June 19, 1841 - October 27, 1905, in Grey Jacket, ser. 3, v. 14, p. 96-98, November 1905)

      On his death, in 1905, he was lamented as "a man of astonishing simplicity and modesty"; as one who combined soldierly qualities with rare gentleness; as a humaitarian devoted to education and to human welfare, particularly among the poverty-stricken and the Negro race. Especially pertinent to his being honored by Virginia Agricultural end Mechanical College, was his profound influence on the strengthening of this institution by helping Dr. J. B. McBryde and by aiding him powerfully in improving and establishing policies which have made the Virginia Polytechnic Institute of today a reality.

       

      From the report of the committee established to consider names of certain buildings on campus, sent to Dr. Walter S. Newman, President, on April 26, 1962.

    • 1900-08 J. Thompson Brown

      John Thompson Brown served on the board of visitors from 1889 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921 and was rector from 1900 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921.

       

      By Professor H. S. Worthington, Sweet Briar College

       

      The Honorable John Thompson Brown needs no introduction to the alumni and friends of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Ever since his first appointment to its board of visitors, in March, 1890, by Governor McKinney, he has been recognized on all sides as one of the ablest administrators that the Institute has ever had. The Virginia Polytechnic Institute has been for him not only a very real and constant interest and an unselfish devotion, but an ideal and a passion. The results of this, as shown in the services that Mr. Brown has rendered the institution, are also well known. Indeed, they are already recorded, both in the history of the V. P. I. and in the records of educational advance in Virginia. Therefore, when the editors of the BULLETIN present in this issue a sketch of Mr. Brown's career, they do so realizing that the sketch will be but a repetition of facts already familiar to its readers, but confident also that these facts, relating as they do to a tried and loyal friend, will be received with pleasure&emthat inexpressibly keen pleasure peculiar to the renewal of old friendships, interrupted perhaps by the busy interests of practical life, but none the less living and cherished.

       

      John Thompson Brown was born at "Stanley," near Old Church, Hanover County, February 19th, 1861. He is the only child of Anne Frances Bland (Coalter) and Henry Peronneau Brown, who lived at the family home of the latter, "Ivy Cliff," in Bedford County. Several of his ancestors were men well known in Virginia's history. Among these might be mentioned, on his mother's side, John Coalter, of Augusta County, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, and John Randolph, of Roanoke, who was a half-brother of his maternal great grandmother. On the paternal side were Samuel Brown, of Rockbridge, a distinguished Presbyterian divine, and his grandfather, John Thompson Brown, who, after a brilliant career at Princeton, was a prominent representative of Petersburg in the General Assembly of Virginia.

       

      Mr. Brown's childhood and early youth were spent at his father's home in Bedford. He was educated at McCabe's School and at the University of Virginia. In both of these institutions he was prominent in athletics and very popular among his fellow students. He left the University without taking a degree, married Miss Cassie Dallas Tucker, of Richmond, and took up farming on the family estate in Bedford.

       

      Intensely interested in the advancement of agriculture, he soon became a member of the executive committee of the Farmers' Assembly, the forerunner of the Farmers' Alliance. In this capacity he urged the importance of putting the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, into the hands of practical farmers and mechanics to the end that it might be made a vital and effective force in the development of Virginia's resources. In March, 1890, he was appointed to the board of visitors of the college. He served as a visitor continuously until 1896. In 1891-1892 he represented Bedford County in the Legislature, and in 1892 he was an elector for the Sixth Congressional District on the Cleveland ticket. He was reappointed in 1898 to the V. P. I. board of visitors, and was elected its rector when the late Captain C. E. Vawter resigned.

       

      Writing May 3d, 1901, Captain Vawter spoke of his successor. In the following terms: "Mr. John Thompson Brown was associated with me several years on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. There I learned to know him well and to appreciate his worth. I found him to be a man of sterling integrity, high character, and firmness of purpose. He is slow to come to a decision. He weighs carefully both sides of a question. But, when he decides what is right, he adheres to it, let the consequences be what they may. He acts from principle, not policy. As a State official, he is always true to his trust. While always generous, kind, and true to his friends, he never seeks the advancement of anyone at the expense of the State. He is a delightful social companion, a true friend, a faithful officer, and a Christian gentleman. The present prosperity of the college is largely due to his faithfulness and firmness."

       

      Some idea of the esteem in which Mr. Brown was held by the students of the institution he has served so well may be gained from the following dedication of the 1901 Bugle:

       

      "To the popular rector of our board of visitors,

      JOHN THOMPSON BROWN,

      genial and large-hearted in private life, a public-spirited and progressive

      citizen, an able legislator and wise counselor, the steadfast and

      devoted friend of our institution, this publication is

      dedicated as an evidence of our

      affectionate regard."

       

      It was during his terms of service as visitor and rector that the Virginia Polytechnic Institute made the rapid strides that have put it in the forefront of Virginia institutions of learning. Mr. Brown served as rector until July, 1908, when his term expired and Governor Swanson failed to reappoint him. While Dr. McBryde was absent on account of ill health in 1905-1906, the board of visitors elected Mr. Brown to act as president in his stead at a salary of two thousand dollars. He declined to accept remuneration as being inconsistent with his position, but consented to supervise the affairs of the college during the enforced absence of the president. When Dr. McBryde retired permanently, Mr. Brown's name was mentioned for the V. P. I. presidency. In addition to his activities in behalf of the college, Mr. Brown had been, in the meanwhile, instrumental in securing the creation, by the State Legislature, of the Crop Pest Commission, the Cattle Quarantine Commission, of which he was chairman for ten years, and the Virginia Truck Experiment Station, which he served as a member of the first board of governors. He had also represented Bedford County, together with the late Honorable John Goode, in the Constitutional Convention. Here he was an active member of several important committees, among them the committee on taxation and finance, and the committee on education. The able fight which he led both in the former committee and on the floor of the convention, in behalf of good roads, paved the way for State aid to road building. And, undoubtedly, much of the remarkable highway development of the past decade is due to the fact that the State of Virginia has both encouraged and aided the movement for good roads.

       

      Mr. Brown was a candidate in the Democratic primary of 1909 for the position of Commissioner of Agriculture of Virginia. He was defeated by Mr. Koiner by some eleven hundred votes out of a total of over sixty thousand votes cast. In 1912 he was reappointed to the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute by Governor Mann; and when, last June, the Honorable L. E. Johnson relinquished the duties of the rectorship, which he had so satisfactorily filled, it was but natural that the board should choose Mr. Brown as his successor.

       

      Mr. Brown is a strong man, physically, mentally, and morally. It is through these qualities that he has won recognition all over Virginia. Farmers, students, professional men, and State political leaders all trust and admire him. He is a man of wide culture, with all the breadth of interest that the phrase conveys; he is a constant and thoughtful reader; a lover of the country and of rural life; an unselfish devotee to principle first of all; a lover of home, a devoted husband and father; an active churchman; a Democrat with both a large and a small d; a progressive conservative; a loyal friend, generous, hospitable, modest, refined&emin short, a Virginia gentleman. And in these twentieth century days of narrow specialization, of pallid, homeless, childless, city flatdwellers, of self-seeking greed and graft, of presidential and ex-presidential vilification and vituperation, it is men&embut far too few, alas&emof the John Thompson Brown type that stand out in bold relief.

       

      From the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Catalog) 1912 (Vol. V, No. 4, October, 1912), pp. 25-29

    • 1908-10 J. C. Carrington

      John Cullen Carrington served on the board of visitors from 1901 to 1912 and was rector from 1908 to 1910.

       

      John Cullen Carrington was from Charlotte Court House, in Charlotte County, Va. He was a county commissioner and served on the County Councils of the Agricultural Council of Safety.

    • 1910-12 L. E. Johnson

      Lucius E. Johnson served on the board of visitors from 1908 to 1912 and was rector from 1910 to 1912.

       

      The following is from the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institue, Vol. I, No. 4, October, 1908, pp. 10-12.

       

      New Members Of The Board Of Visitors

      (Extract from Men of Mark of Virginia, Vol. I.)

       

      Lucius E Johnson Lucius E Johnson

       

      Lucius E. Johnson, railroad president, was born in Aurora, Illinois, April 13, 1846, and is the son of John Spencer and Eliza Johnson. His father was a blacksmith and veterinary surgeon, the typical "village blacksmith," honest, strong and upright. Mrs. Eliza Johnson was a noble Christian woman, intelligent, shrewd, practical, and exerted a strong influence over her son both intellectually and morally.

       

      Lucius Johnson was sent to the public free schools of his native town. There he acquired a "practical English education," as the phrase goes, and this has served him in good stead in his office work as a railroad manager and president. In boyhood and youth, Mr. Johnson was blessed with good health, due partly to playing and working and partly to the vigor of his parents. While at school, he spent some of his spare time reading history and books on mechanical subjects. He rested his mind at times by reading good novels. "Honest study, good playing, and fondness for work," he says, helps to account for his first successes.

       

      His first strong impulse in life was the necessity of earning a livelihood. After leaving the public school of Aurora, Ill., he entered the railroad service as a brakeman. Then he served as fireman and as a locomotive engineer. In these positions, he did his duty and did it every day, and, looking back over his successful life, he finds that the secret of his success is persistent devotion to his work, and he believes that this same persistence will generally bring success. For some years, Mr. Johnson was a master mechanic at Aurora, Ill. In 1886, he was made superintendent of the St. Louis division of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. In December, 1888, he returned to Aurora as superintendent of the Chicago division of the same road. In 1890, he was asked to take the superintendency of the Montana Central Railroad, with headquarters at Helena, Montana. In less than three years, he was made superintendent of the Michigan division of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, and in July, 1897, became general superintendent of the Norfolk and Western Railway. In two years, he was made vice-president and general manager of the whole Norfolk and Western system. On the 30th of September, 1903, Lucius E. Johnson was elected to the presidency of the Norfolk and Western Railway, a position which he is now filling with conspicuous ability.

       

      The newspapers of October 1, 1903, in announcing Mr. Johnson's election, used their largest headlines. "Started as Fireman," said one paper, in enormous type. If they had asked Mr. Johnson to solve the mystery, he might well have said, "There is no mystery, only natural law in the moral world;" persistent devotion to his duty day by day placed him in his high position.

       

      Commenting editorially, one of our dailies said: "A striking example of the opportunity afforded young men of ability, industry and determination, to rise in this country to the highest positions of trust and responsibility, is forcibly exhibited in the recent election of Mr. L. E. Johnson to be president of the Norfolk and Western Railway Corporation." Another paper said: "In the front rank of the high railroad officials of the world must be enrolled Mr. Lucius E. Johnson, the new president of the Norfolk and Western Railway. But a few years ago he wore the greasy overalls of a locomotive fireman of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad* * * * Mr. Johnson is amiable, just, unselfish and stern, and to these qualities, combined with his marvelous insight into human nature and his tremendous capacity for work without waste, has been due his constant advance in railroad circles."

       

      Mr. Johnson belongs to the Masonic order, and to social clubs in Cincinnati, Roanoke and Norfolk. In these, he takes relaxation from the strenuous duties of his office. Further pleasure he derives from baseball, dogs and horses.

       

      Mr. Johnson has patented a railway scoop-car and a signal lamp fixture, both of which are used by the railroads of the country. In political preference, Mr. Johnson is a Democrat, what was known as "Gold Democrat," which we may say to the young reader, means that he did not endorse the doctrine of "free silver at a ratio of 16 to 1," and did not favor the election of W. J. Bryan to the presidency.

       

      On April 10, 1869, Mr. Johnson married Miss Ella Parker. They have had five children, only two of whom are now living. He and his family reside at 204 Mountain Avenue, Roanoke, Virginia.

       

      Johnson retired from the railroad presidency and became chairman of the board of directors in the mid teens. He retired from that postion on January 1, 1921. He died at the age of 74 on February 9, 1921, in Deland, Florida, after a brief illness. His body was returned to Roanoke for funeral services, then transported to his former hometown of Aurora, Illinois, for burial. He was survied by his widow, two sons, George P. Johnson of Pittsburgh, Pa., and Edward M. Johnson of Roanoke.

       

    • 1912-21 J. Thompson Brown

      John Thompson Brown served on the board of visitors from 1889 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921 and was rector from 1900 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1921.

       

      By Professor H. S. Worthington, Sweet Briar College

       

      The Honorable John Thompson Brown needs no introduction to the alumni and friends of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Ever since his first appointment to its board of visitors, in March, 1890, by Governor McKinney, he has been recognized on all sides as one of the ablest administrators that the Institute has ever had. The Virginia Polytechnic Institute has been for him not only a very real and constant interest and an unselfish devotion, but an ideal and a passion. The results of this, as shown in the services that Mr. Brown has rendered the institution, are also well known. Indeed, they are already recorded, both in the history of the V. P. I. and in the records of educational advance in Virginia. Therefore, when the editors of the BULLETIN present in this issue a sketch of Mr. Brown's career, they do so realizing that the sketch will be but a repetition of facts already familiar to its readers, but confident also that these facts, relating as they do to a tried and loyal friend, will be received with pleasure&emthat inexpressibly keen pleasure peculiar to the renewal of old friendships, interrupted perhaps by the busy interests of practical life, but none the less living and cherished.

       

      John Thompson Brown was born at "Stanley," near Old Church, Hanover County, February 19th, 1861. He is the only child of Anne Frances Bland (Coalter) and Henry Peronneau Brown, who lived at the family home of the latter, "Ivy Cliff," in Bedford County. Several of his ancestors were men well known in Virginia's history. Among these might be mentioned, on his mother's side, John Coalter, of Augusta County, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, and John Randolph, of Roanoke, who was a half-brother of his maternal great grandmother. On the paternal side were Samuel Brown, of Rockbridge, a distinguished Presbyterian divine, and his grandfather, John Thompson Brown, who, after a brilliant career at Princeton, was a prominent representative of Petersburg in the General Assembly of Virginia.

       

      Mr. Brown's childhood and early youth were spent at his father's home in Bedford. He was educated at McCabe's School and at the University of Virginia. In both of these institutions he was prominent in athletics and very popular among his fellow students. He left the University without taking a degree, married Miss Cassie Dallas Tucker, of Richmond, and took up farming on the family estate in Bedford.

       

      Intensely interested in the advancement of agriculture, he soon became a member of the executive committee of the Farmers' Assembly, the forerunner of the Farmers' Alliance. In this capacity he urged the importance of putting the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, now the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, into the hands of practical farmers and mechanics to the end that it might be made a vital and effective force in the development of Virginia's resources. In March, 1890, he was appointed to the board of visitors of the college. He served as a visitor continuously until 1896. In 1891-1892 he represented Bedford County in the Legislature, and in 1892 he was an elector for the Sixth Congressional District on the Cleveland ticket. He was reappointed in 1898 to the V. P. I. board of visitors, and was elected its rector when the late Captain C. E. Vawter resigned.

       

      Writing May 3d, 1901, Captain Vawter spoke of his successor. In the following terms: "Mr. John Thompson Brown was associated with me several years on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. There I learned to know him well and to appreciate his worth. I found him to be a man of sterling integrity, high character, and firmness of purpose. He is slow to come to a decision. He weighs carefully both sides of a question. But, when he decides what is right, he adheres to it, let the consequences be what they may. He acts from principle, not policy. As a State official, he is always true to his trust. While always generous, kind, and true to his friends, he never seeks the advancement of anyone at the expense of the State. He is a delightful social companion, a true friend, a faithful officer, and a Christian gentleman. The present prosperity of the college is largely due to his faithfulness and firmness."

       

      Some idea of the esteem in which Mr. Brown was held by the students of the institution he has served so well may be gained from the following dedication of the 1901 Bugle:

       

      "To the popular rector of our board of visitors,

      JOHN THOMPSON BROWN,

      genial and large-hearted in private life, a public-spirited and progressive

      citizen, an able legislator and wise counselor, the steadfast and

      devoted friend of our institution, this publication is

      dedicated as an evidence of our

      affectionate regard."

       

      It was during his terms of service as visitor and rector that the Virginia Polytechnic Institute made the rapid strides that have put it in the forefront of Virginia institutions of learning. Mr. Brown served as rector until July, 1908, when his term expired and Governor Swanson failed to reappoint him. While Dr. McBryde was absent on account of ill health in 1905-1906, the board of visitors elected Mr. Brown to act as president in his stead at a salary of two thousand dollars. He declined to accept remuneration as being inconsistent with his position, but consented to supervise the affairs of the college during the enforced absence of the president. When Dr. McBryde retired permanently, Mr. Brown's name was mentioned for the V. P. I. presidency. In addition to his activities in behalf of the college, Mr. Brown had been, in the meanwhile, instrumental in securing the creation, by the State Legislature, of the Crop Pest Commission, the Cattle Quarantine Commission, of which he was chairman for ten years, and the Virginia Truck Experiment Station, which he served as a member of the first board of governors. He had also represented Bedford County, together with the late Honorable John Goode, in the Constitutional Convention. Here he was an active member of several important committees, among them the committee on taxation and finance, and the committee on education. The able fight which he led both in the former committee and on the floor of the convention, in behalf of good roads, paved the way for State aid to road building. And, undoubtedly, much of the remarkable highway development of the past decade is due to the fact that the State of Virginia has both encouraged and aided the movement for good roads.

       

      Mr. Brown was a candidate in the Democratic primary of 1909 for the position of Commissioner of Agriculture of Virginia. He was defeated by Mr. Koiner by some eleven hundred votes out of a total of over sixty thousand votes cast. In 1912 he was reappointed to the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute by Governor Mann; and when, last June, the Honorable L. E. Johnson relinquished the duties of the rectorship, which he had so satisfactorily filled, it was but natural that the board should choose Mr. Brown as his successor.

       

      Mr. Brown is a strong man, physically, mentally, and morally. It is through these qualities that he has won recognition all over Virginia. Farmers, students, professional men, and State political leaders all trust and admire him. He is a man of wide culture, with all the breadth of interest that the phrase conveys; he is a constant and thoughtful reader; a lover of the country and of rural life; an unselfish devotee to principle first of all; a lover of home, a devoted husband and father; an active churchman; a Democrat with both a large and a small d; a progressive conservative; a loyal friend, generous, hospitable, modest, refined&emin short, a Virginia gentleman. And in these twentieth century days of narrow specialization, of pallid, homeless, childless, city flatdwellers, of self-seeking greed and graft, of presidential and ex-presidential vilification and vituperation, it is men&embut far too few, alas&emof the John Thompson Brown type that stand out in bold relief.

       

      From the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Catalog) 1912 (Vol. V, No. 4, October, 1912), pp. 25-29

       

    • 1921-26 J. B. Watkins

      John Benjamin Watkins served on the board of visitors from 1903 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1928 and was rector from 1921 to 1926.

       

      Watkins was born June 14, 1855, in Powhatan County, Va. He began Watkins Nursery in the Midlothian, Va., area with his brother in 1876. He also served on the board of Farmville State Teachers College (now Longwood University).

       

      Watkins was a Virginia state senator from 1908 to 1912 and from 1927 to 1931. He was elected to represent Chesterfield. He was also involved with the Virginia Agricultural Council of Safety, representing Chesterfield County and serving as chairman.

       

      He died Nov. 30, 1931 and is buried at Bethel Baptist Church in Midlothian.

       

      --------

       

      This sketch was by Professor Richard H. Hudnall, professor of English, and was printed in the Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute -- The State Agricultural and Mechanical College, Vol. 5, No. 4, October 1912, pp. 31-32.

       

      J. B. Watkins was born on his father's farm in the lower end of Powhatan County, June 14th, 1855. After studying in the private schools near his home, he became in 1873 a student at Richmond College. Later he returned to his father's farm and with his father carried on agricultural work. Thirty or more years ago, he began the nursery business, growing at first only fruit trees; later, however, as the business developed, shade trees, ornamental shrubs and evergreens have been grown. The nursery has proved a very profitable enterprise and the business has greatly increased in the last few years.

       

      In 1879, Mr. Watkins was married to Miss Lelia N. Michaux, of Michaux, Powhatan County, Virginia. Of the ten children born to them, eight are still living. Two of the sons are graduates of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

       

      In the nineties Mr. Watkins was elected for a number of years president of the Virginia State Fair Association, of Richmond. He was elected also, in 1907, to the Senate of Virginia from the Sixteenth Senatorial District, served four years and was reelected in 1911. He was appointed by Governor Montague a member of the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and served six or seven years prior to 1908. He was then appointed by Governor Swanson on the board of the State Normal School at Farmville. In June, 1912, he was reappointed to the Virginia Polytechnic Institute board of visitors by Governor Mann. He is also president of the Chesterfield County Agricultural Association.

       

    • 1926-43 Robert S. Moss

      Robert S. Moss served on the board of visitors from 1918 to 1943 and was rector from 1926 to 1943.

       

      Moss was from Burkes Garden, Va. He was born in 1874 and died in 1943 at the age of 69. He was married to Caroline Dunn on Sept. 11, 1901. They had one son, Joseph S. Moss.

       

    • 1943-48 James P. Woods

      James Pleasant Woods served on the board of visitors from 1924 to 1948 and was rector from 1943 to 1948.

       

      James Pleasant Woods, was born near Roanoke, on February 4, 1868. He attended the common schools and was graduated from Roanoke College in 1892. He studied law at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1892 and 1893, and was admitted to the bar in the latter year and commenced practice in Roanoke. He served as mayor of Roanoke from 1898-1900.

       

      Woods was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-fifth (1917-1919) and Sixty-sixth (1919-1921) Congresses to fill the vacancies caused by the resignation of Carter Glass and was reelected to the Sixty-seventh (1921-1923) Congress. He served from February 25, 1919, to March 3, 1923. He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1922 and resumed the practice of law.

       

      Woods was president of the board of trustees of Roanoke College and a member of the board of trustees of the Randolph-Macon system of colleges. He served on the board of visitors of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute from 1924 to 1948 and was rector from 1943 to 1948. He died in Roanoke on July 7, 1948, and is buried in Evergreen Burial Park.

       

      From the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

    • 1948-52 William E. Wine

      William E. Wine (Class of 1904), served on the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors from 1943 to 1954 and was rector from 1948 to 1952. He also served as president and member of the board of directors of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association.

       

      Wine was born in Bridgewater, Va. He entered Virginia Polytechnic Institute as a sophomore rat in September 1901. He was graduated in June 1904, with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. He was an assistant in the Virginia Tech Department of Graphics in 1904 and 1905 and received the degree of mechanical engineer in June 1905. He worked for the Atlantic Coast Line Railway as a draftsman then resident engineer before ending up as chief mechanical draftsman. During his time with the railroad, from 1906 to 1913, he designed and patented a number of parts for railroad cars and locomotives.

       

      The Wine Railway Appliance Co. was established in Toledo, Ohio, in July 1912 to manufacture some of the parts Wine had designed. Wine was elected president of the company in September 1913 and left the railroad to take that post, where he continued to design and patent additional parts. The Industrial Steel Casting Co. was organized with Wine's assistance in 1919 in Toledo to manufacture castings, sheet steel, steel wire, wire rope, pig iron, and structural steel products. He served as chairman of the board of directors and of the Executive Committee of this company.

       

      Wine devoted much of his time to his businesses, but he did make time to be active in the alumni association and his game farm in Virginia, where, with the co-operation of the state game department he raised the only pure breed of wild turkeys in captivity.

       

      Wine also was a trustee at Bridgewater College from 1951 to 1955. The William E. and Margaret K. Wine Endowed Scholarship Fund was set up there in 1982.

       

      The William E. Wine Award was established in his memory at Virginia Tech by the Alumni Fund Council in 1956. These awards, first presented in 1957, went to the most outstanding teacher in each school until 1962. Beginning that year, the award went to three faculty members elected at large from a selection nominated by students, faculty, and alumni.

       

      He died in 1956. His wife, Margaret, died in 1983.

       

    • 1952-56 Vernon G. Eberwine

      Vernon G. Eberwine was a member of the board of visitors from 1944 to 1956 and served as rector from 1952 to 1956.

       

      Eberwine was born Feb. 4, 1896, to John George And Annah Mildred Gaskins Eberwine. He graduated in 1912 from the Agricultural High School at Driver in Nansemond County, Va,m and attended Randolph Macon College at Ashland, Va. He transferred to and was graduated from Virginia Tech in 1917.

       

      He operated a cannery business in partnership with two brothers. He served for 30 years as chairman of the Nansemond County Board of Supervisors. He was also a member of the State Board of Agriculture and the Tidewater Virginia Development Council. He served on the board of directors of Louise Obici Hospital in Suffolk, Va.

       

      He was named first citizen of Suffolk and Nansemond County in 1961 by the Suffolk Rotary Club.

       

      He died Dec. 13, 1962, after suffering a heart attack Nov. 24.

       

    • 1956-62 Guy L. Furr

      Guy L. Furr served on the board of visitors from 1954 to 1962 and was rector from 1956 to 1962.

       

      Furr was born Jan. 19, 1895, in Bluemont in Loudoun County, Va. His parents were John William Thompson Furr and Mary Frances Frasier Furr.

       

      He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1916 with a degree in electrical engineering and went to work for Appalachian Power in Bluefield, W.Va. He served in a number of positions there until 1943, when he was named manager of the Bluefield Division. From there, he moved to Roanoke, Va., in 1946 as assistant general manager. On Nov. 1, 1952, he became vice president and general manager of the company, a position he held until he retired in January 1960. Furr continued as a vice president and consultant, working on the development of the Smith Mountain Lake hydroelectric project that was under way at that time.

       

      He married Sammye Ada Ferguson on Sept. 10, 1924. They had one daughter, Mary Catherine Furr, and a son, Guy Littleton Furr Jr.

       

      Furr was also involved in professional associations, the business community, and local organizations. He was a past president and director of Southeastern Electric Exchange, a trade association of electric utilities serving the southeastern states, as well as a past president of both the Bluefield and Roanoke chambers of commerce, a director of S.H. Heironimus (the Roanoke department store chain), and a director of the Blue Ridge Boy Scout Council.

       

      He died Feb. 15, 1977 in Roanoke.

       

      He received the Alumni Distinguished Service award from the university in 1973.

    • 1962-64 W. Thomas Rice

      W. Thomas Rice served on the board of visitors from 1961 to 1968 and was rector from 1962 to 1964.

       

      William Thomas Rice was born in 1913 in Hague, Va. In 1930, at the beginning of the Great Depression, an Episcopal minister recommended to Mrs. Alfred I. DuPont that she provide a college scholarship for a young man from rural Virginia. To prove to the minister and Mrs. DuPont that they were wise in their decision, Tom Rice graduated from Virginia Tech in 1934 with the highest academic average in his civil engineering class and was one of only two seniors in his class of 200 to be offered a job upon graduation.

       

      Rice began a long railroad career with that job with the Pennsylvania Railroad as a track supervisor. He left that job to serve the Army in World War II, directing overseas operations of the Military Railway Service in both the European and Pacific Theaters. He was was awarded the Legion of Merit with two Oak Leaf Clusters. He continued to serve in the Army Reserve and rose to the rank of major general. In 1999, Rice was inducted into the Army Transportation Corps Hall of Fame.

       

      After the war, Rice resumed his railroad career, going to work for the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac (RF&P) Railroad in 1946. He was elected president of that line in 1955, and two years later was appointed the president of the Atlantic Coast Line (ACL) Railroad Company. In that capacity, he worked with John W. Smith, president of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, to effect a merger of the two railroads, which took place on July 1, 1967. Rice was elected president of the new Seaboard Coast Line Railroad and in 1970, he was elected chairman and CEO of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Co. (SCL) of Richmond and its holding company, Seaboard Coast Line Industries. He retired in 1977 but was still active in the railroad industry. Rice worked with Hays T. Watkins to merge the SCL and the Chessie System to form CSX Corporation on Nov. 1, 1980. Rice served on CSX's original Board of Directors.

       

      Rice was also on the board of trustees for many business and philanthropic organizations, including: Borden, Inc., Florida Rock Industries, Bank of America and the Chemical Bank of New York. He served as a trustee of the Virginia Episcopal Seminary and of the American Association of Homes for the Aging, and was a member of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce, the Advisory Board of The Citadel, and Virginia Military Institute's Board of Visitors. He was awarded honorary doctorates in military science from The Citadel and in laws from Stetson University.

       

      At Virginia Tech, he endowed three scholarships for members of the Corps of Cadets who major in engineering, served as Director of the Virginia Tech Foundation, President of the Alumni Association, was a charter member of the Rowe Fellow Program, and a member of the College of Engineering Committee of 100, Ut Prosim Society, Corps of Cadets Alumni Board, William Preston Society, and several other university organizations. In recognition of his contributions, Virginia Tech presented Rice with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1973, the Engineering Distinguished Alumni Award in 1980, and the William Ruffner Medal in 1981.

       

      Rice died on Sunday, February 5, 2006, at the age of 93 in Richmond. He was preceded in death by his wife of 67 years, Jacqueline Johnston Rice, and a son, John Rice. Rice is survived by a daughter, Jaqueline Rice Heard, seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

    • 1964-70 Harry C. Wyatt

      Harry Cassell Wyatt served on the board of visitors from 1961 to 1968 and was rector from 1962 to 1964.

       

      Wyatt was a native of Ivanhoe in Wythe County, Va. He began working for the Norfolk & Western Railway in 1916 as a mail carrier at age 14 in Pulaski, Va., where his father was agent-yardmaster. He worked suring the summers for the railroad in Pulaski and Roanoke, Va., while attending Greenbrier Military Academy and Virginia Tech.

       

      Wyatt was graduated from Tech 1924 and went to work with the Norfolk & Western as a special apprentice in the Roanoke shops. He moved on to serve as an assistant foreman and foreman at Iaeger, W.Va., and as assistant road foreman of engines, general foreman, assistant master mechanic and superintendent of the Shenandoah, Scioto and Pocahontas divisions. In 1942, he returned to Roanoke as assistant general superintendent of motive power. It was in that postion that he was involved in the development of the J Class passenger locomotives and some of the last steam engines built in the Roanoke shops.

       

      In 1953, Wyatt moved up to vice president and general manager and senior vice president in 1963. He was involved in the growth of the railroad through the merger with the Virginian Railway in 1959 and the Nickel Plate-Wabash merger in 1964. He retired July 1, 1967.

       

      After Wyatt retired, he concentrated on raising prize-winning Hereford cattle on his Crestline Farm near Elliston, Va. He was also involved in many boards and civic activities, holding a position as a fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a director of First National Exchange Bank and its parent Dominion Bankshares Corp., director of First Federal Savings and Loan Association, a past president of Roanoke Symphony, a director of Roanoke Hospital Association and a leader in the Red Cross and a member of the Citizens Advisory Civic Center Committee.

       

      Wyatt died of an apparent heart attack in Anderson, S.C., on April 5, 1973, while returning from a family vacation in Florida. He is buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke. His wife, Frances Powell Wyatt, died in Sept., 1975, and is also buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke.

    • 1970-75 C. Eugene Rowe

      C. Eugene Rowe served on the board of visitors from 1968 to 1976 and was rector from 1970 to 1975.

       

      Rowe was a native of Northumberland County, Va., the son of the county treasurer. He had had to borrow money to enroll at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1926 as a business major. He was active in a variety of extracurricular activities, was editor of both the student newspaper and the yearbook, and was an officer in the Corps of Cadets. Rowe was a founder and first president of the VPI chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa, the student leadership fraternity.

       

      Rowe graduated in 1933, in the depths of the Great Depression, with academic honors. His first job was with the Continental Oil Co. in Richmond, Va., in accounting. Two years later, he began a 20-year association with Burlington Industries in North Carolina. While with Burlington, he completed an advanced management program through Harvard University. He then joined the Baldwin Piano Company in Cincinnati, Ohio, then moved to Dan River Mills (later Dan River Inc.) as secretary-treasurer, first at Danville, Va., and later at Greenville, S.C. At his retirement in 1976, he was Dan River's vice president and chief financial officer.

       

      While he was with Burlington, he married Salem, Va., native Mary Lewis Johnson. They had a son and a daughter. Rowe also remained connected with his alma mater, serving as a founding member of the original Central Carolina Alumni chapter. He was also a founding director of the VPI Educational Foundation (now the Virginia Tech Foundation) and one of the prime movers in the planning and fund-raising for the World War II memorial chapel. He was elected to the Alumni Association board in the early 1950s, served as vice president from 1958 to 1962 and president from 1962 to 1965. Rowe served succesively as president (from 1972 to 1982) and chairman (from 1982 to 1985) of the Virginia Tech Foundation.

       

      Rowe served two successive four-year terms (from 1968 to 1976) on the board of visitors and was rector from 1970 to 1975. He continued as a dedicated and active alumnus, so much so that Mary Lewis used to say, "I guess I married an institution as well as a man." In 1978, he was awared the William H. Ruffner Medal. Rowe remained active in alumni and university affairs until his death in 1987.

       

       

       

    • 1975-78 G. Frank Clement

      G. Frank Clement served on the board of visitors from 1971 to 1979 and was rector from 1975 to 1978.

       

      Clement was born Aug. 22, 1907. He went from selling insurance for the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co. to become president of the Shenandoah Life Insurance Co. in Roanoke, Va. He retired from that position in 1972 and served as chairman of the company until 1978.

       

      Community service was important to Clement. He served on an inter-racial committee in 1960s that led to the integration of restaurants, theaters, and companies in Roanoke. He continued to work for equal access when he resigned his membership in the Shenandoah Club in 1983 to protest its exclusionary policies.

       

      After retirement, he served on Roanoke City Council for the first six months of 1980 to fill an unexpired term of a member who had resigned. He was named the Roanoke Citizen of the Year in 1985 and was one of the first laureates inducted into the Southwest Virginia Business Hall of Fame when it was established in 1990 by Junior Achievement of Southwestern Virginia

       

      Clement led the fund-raising to help start Center in the Square in downtown Roanoke and served on the board of directors of the facility. He was also involved in many other community organizations. In a Feb. 15, 2009, article in The Roanoke Times, Bill Hopkins, a charter member of Center in the Square's board of directors, said Clement "was certainly one of Roanoke's most outstanding benefactors in the last half of the 20th century."

       

      He died March 1, 2001, at age 93 and is buried in Evergreen Burial Park in Roanoke.

       

    • 1978-81 Parke C. Brinkley

      Parke C. Brinkley served on the board of visitors from 1974 to 1982 and was rector from 1978 to 1981.

       

      Parke Culver Brinkley was born on July 31, 1915, to Fairlie Brinkley and Mary Emily Culver Brinkley. He grew up on a farm near Suffolk in Nansemond County, Va. He attended public schools in Nansemond County and graduated from Randolph Macon Academy in Bedford, Va. He attended Virginia Tech and was graduated in 1937. After graduation, he returned to Nansemond County as an extension agent, then was hired by the Association of Virginia Peanut and Hog Growers to be its first executive secretary. He was in that position when Gov. John Battle appointed him in 1950 to be the the commissioner of agriculture for the commonwealth. He served in that capacity until 1962. From there, he went on Washington, D.C., to serve as president of the National Agricultural Chemicals Association (NACA), a trade group of manufacturers and formulators of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides.

       

      During his time with the NACA, Brinkley was the face of the pesticide industry at the time Rachel Carson published her book "Silent Spring" that was critcal of the use of chemicals to control pests and was quoted and published quite extensively.

       

      He was on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In 1976, CropLife America presented Brinkley its Lea S. Hitchner Service Award in recognition of outstanding service to CropLife America and the crop protection industry.

       

      Brinkley retired in 1976 and devoted more time to his other love, sporting dogs. He was a founding director of the National Open Shooting Dog Championship Association in 1961 and is still listed as an honorary director of the organization. He contributed considerbably to how shooting dog trials are run and champions are determined. He won several championships himself with his dogs. He has been elected to the Field Trial Hall of Fame and the Pointer/Setter Hall of Fame.

       

      In 1980, Brinkley was an Alumni Distinguished Service award recipient from Virginia Tech. This award recognizes individuals for their contributions to the university. In 1986, he was presented with the William H. Ruffner Medal. This award was created to provide appropriate public recognition to individuals who have performed notable and distinguished service to the university.

       

      He married Dorothy Holland and they had a daughter, Kaye, and a son, Richard Fairlie. Dorothy died in 2002. He retired to Mecklenburg County and died at age 93 in South Hill, Va., on Nov. 26, 2008. He is buried in Liberty Springs Christian Church Cemetery in Suffolk.

       

    • 1981-83 Charles O. Gordon

      Charles O. Gordon served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1981 to 1983.

       

      Gordon grew up in Marion, the son of Pearl Cable Gordon and Lawrence Elliott Gordon, where he learned about entrepreneurship. He sold Burpee seeds, magazine subscriptions, Morton's Salt, and Hershey candy bars. By the time he was 12 years old, he was working summers carrying brick and mortar while training as a carpenter's helper. In 1936, the family moved to Johnson City, Tenn., and Gordon graduated from Science Hill High School. He went on to attend Virginia Tech and graduated in 1942, receiving a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering. The day after graduation, he married Evelyn Anderson of Marion, Va.

       

      Two weeks later, Gordon reported to Fort Eustis in Virginia. From there, he went on to the European theater to serve as a glider operations officer in the Army Air Corps. As a glider pilot, Gordon commanded the 435th Glider Pilot Infantry Company, the first and only all officer combat unit. For his heroism in combat, he earned the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Presidential Citation, the Air Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge, Airborne Infantry Wings, seven Battle Stars, and three Bronze Arrowheads for Airborne invasions.

       

      In 1945, the Gordons moved to Johnson City, where he began working for his father, president of Empire Furniture. Charles Gordon went to the lumberyard, determined to learn the business from the ground up. He established Gordon's Inc., a furniture manufacturing company, in 1947. He was known to load a pick-up truck himself and attend furniture markets to introduce his pieces to buyers. Soon, his clientele included Macy's, Marshall Fields, and other retail outlets in the United States and Canada.

       

      In 1946, Gordon and his brother-in-law Sam Y. Harding started the Tip Bottling Company. They changed its name to Tri-City Beverage Corporation in 1948. Gordon saw an ad in the National Bottling Gazette and contacted William Swartz, the chemist who developed the formula for Dr Enuf. Gordon and Swartz struck a deal, and Tri-City Beverage began bottling Dr. Enuf in 1949. Gordon went on to develop the soft drink Mountain Dew and designed the original bottle, a collector's item today.

       

      Gordon continued his success, starting and venturing into a number of different businesses and charities and involvement in his community and with his alma mater. He started and served as the chairman and chief executive officer of the Bydand Corporation and continued as chairman of the Tri-City Beverage Corporation and Peace River Citrus Groves Inc. He also founded Gordon's Marine, selling and servicing Johnson Motors, and he operated the first independently owned Orvis Store known as the Great Outdoors Shop.

       

      Gordon served as president of the following organizations: Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association, Furniture Library Foundation, and the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games. He served for 35 years as a member of the board of directors of Home Financial Corporation. He served as a member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board for 50 years and 12 years as chairman. In February 1972, he received the Salvation Army National Award, called Others, and in 1989 he was presented with the distinguished William Booth Award. In 1983, he was made an honorary life member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board. He was named Man of the Year by the Board of Governors of the American Furniture Mart in June, 1969, and in November 1978 was honored with the Southern Furniture Manufacturers Association's distinguished James T. Ryan Award.

       

      He served as Mayor of Johnson City in 1969, was a charter member and past president of the Lions Club, and a past member of the Rotary Club. The Greater Tri-Cities Business Alliance inducted him into the Junior Achievement Hall of Fame in 2000. Gordon was a member of Munsey Memorial United Methodist Church.

       

      Gordon served as a director of the Virginia Tech Education Foundation and is a past president of the Alumni Association and the Student Aid Association. He funded an endowed professorship in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department and served as a member of the College of Engineering Committee of 100. He served on the board of visitors for eight years, from 1976 to 1984, and was rector from 1981 to 1983. He is the man most responsible for the original planning of the German Club on campus and a recent addition. In 1974, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1985 was the recipient of the William H. Ruffner Medal, the highest recognition given by the university.

       

      Gordon died Aug. 15, 2004, at Johnson City Medical Center at age 84. He was preceded in death by one son, Jack Curtis Gordon; one brother, Lawrence E. Gordon; and one sister, Marie Harding Ferrari. He was survived by his wife, Evelyn Anderson Gordon; five children, Mary Alice Hardin, Charles O. Gordon Jr., Lucretia Gordon, Evelyn Sexton Gordon, and Robert Preston Gordon; 10 grandchildren; 3 great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

       

    • 1983-84 Lee C. Tait

      Lee C. Tait served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1983 to 1984.

       

      Tait was born in 1919 in Fitchburg, Mass., and raised in West Virginia. He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1941 with a bachlor's degree in electrical engineering. He served as regimental commander of the Corps of Cadets and was a member of the German Club. After graduation, he went to work for Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. in Richmond, VA. Several weeks after accepting his position, Tait took military leave and served in the U.S. Army in Europe and North Africa from 1941 to 1946, attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was awarded the Bronze Star, the French Croix de Guerre, and was appointed an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire.

       

      Tait returned to Chesapeake & Potomac in 1946 to a position as an engineer assistant and a year later was promoted to engineer. He earned a master's degree in industrial management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1956. Tait rose through management positions in engineering, traffic, finance, and general operations in locations around Washington, Virginia, West Virginia, and New York, where he was assistant vice president of AT&T. He returned to Richmond in 1970 as vice president and director of Chesapeake & Potomac of Virginia, a position he held until his retirement in 1984, ending a 43-year career.

       

      Tait was chairman of several organizations, including the Richmond Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges, and the Richmond United Givers Fund Drive. Heserved on the boards of Shenandoah Life Insurance Co., Southern Bank & Trust Co., the YMCA of Greater Richmond, the Richmond Symphony, and the Science Museum of Virginia.

       

      Tait served on the board of visitors from 1976 to 1984 and was rector from 1983 to 1984. He served as president of the Alumni Association and in 1985, and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Richmond chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. In 1983, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1987 he was the recipient of the William H. Ruffner Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the university.

       

      Tait died Dec. 27, 2007, at age 88 in Richmond. He was survived by his wife of 61 years, Hazel Caldwell; one son, Raymond C. Tait and wife, Teresa Deshields; and three daughters, Deborah T. Grover and husband, William, Maryanne Hill and Betti Tait Garber and husband, Gregory; four grandchildren, Leigh Kelly Tait, Sarah Deshields Tait, Morgan Lee Garber and Jordan Caldwell Hill.

       

       

       

    • 1984-87 A. F. Giacco

      Alexander F. Giacco served on the board of visitors from 1979 to 1987 and was rector from 1984 to 1987.

       

      Giacco grew up in Meriden, Conn., the oldest of four children. He attended and graduated from Virginia Tech in 1942 with a bacehlor's degree in chemical engineering. He went to work for Hercules Inc., starting a 45-year career that culminated in his service as the company's president from 1977 to 1987 and chairman of the board from 1980 until his retirement in 1987.

       

      After retirement from Hercules, Giacco went on to serve as chairman and CEO of Himont Inc., a joint venture in polypropylene between Hercules and Italy's Montedison. He also served as president and CEO of Rheometric Scientific Inc., a company that designs, manufactures, and services computer-controlled materials test systems used to make physical property measurements, such as viscosity, elasticity, and thermal analysis behavior on various materials such as plastics, petrochemicals, paints, coatings, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and foods. He also served as chairman and managing director of Axess Corporation, a company that produces polymers and thermoplastics.

       

      In 1984, Financial World named Giacco best chief executive officer in the chemical industry. The Wall Street Transcript voted him the Chemical Industry's Outstanding Chief Executive Officer for three consecutive years in the 1980s.

       

      After Giacco retired from Hercules, the company established the Alexander F. Giacco Presidential Chair at Virginia Tech with a $1 million endowment. The Alexander F. Giacco Engineering Scholarship Fund was subsequently established through his support. He served as a member of the board of visitors from 1979 to 1987 and was rector from 1984 to 1987. He was inducted into the College of Engineering's Academy of Engineering Excellence in 2000 and was a member of the college's Committee of 100. In 1989, he received the University Distinguished Achievement Award for "significant achievement of enduring significance to society." In 2002, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award.

       

      Giacco and his wife, Edith, raised five children in their home in Wilmington, Del. They were also active in the community in a variety of organizations. In 1985, Pierre S. duPont III realized that the charitable needs of Delaware's nonprofit agencies and institutions were more than existing resources could support. He approached DuPont CEO Edward G. Jefferson and Hercules CEO Alexander F. Giacco for help in establishing the Delaware Community Foundation. Giacco was one of the founding members of the board of the foundation. He was also involved in The Grand, which restored The Grand Opera House from a run-down move theatre into a downtown attraction. He is recognized as a chairman emeritus of the board of directors. "The baby grand" began as the historic Aldine Theater built in 1921. It was acquired by The Grand in 1992 to create the Edith and Alexander F. Giacco Building in 2000, and now it's a cozy 305-seat theater that occupies the first floor.

       

    • 1987-89 W. S. White Jr.

      W. S. "Pete" White Jr. served on the board of visitors from 1981 to 1989 and was rector from 1987 to 1989.

       

      White was born in 1926 and grew up in eastern Virginia. He enrolled in the Virginia Tech College of Engineering in 1943, and graduated in 1948 with a bachelor degree in electrical engineering. His studies were interrupted by more than a year of military service. He went to work for American Gas & Electric Co. (it changed its name to American Electric Power Co. (AEP) in 1958).

       

      White served in a variety of positions with AEP. He earned a master's degree in industrial management as a Sloan Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1958. He was elected chairman of American Electric Power in 1976, which had always been located in New York City. In 1980, the company moved its headquarters from New York to Columbus, Ohio. On Jan. 1, 1991, White stepped down as chief executive officer and retired as chairman effective Dec. 31, 1991.

       

      White served as president of the USNC of CIGRÉ and ascended to the chair of CIGRÉ international in the 1980s. CIGRÉ is an acronym for a French title that means The International Council For Large Electric Systems, which is headquartered in Paris.

       

      White serves on the board of the Virginia Tech Foundation and was a founding member of the Academy of Engineering Excellence. AEP has also created a chaired professorship in engineering in White's name. White received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 1989 and was presented with the William H. Ruffner Medal in 1990.

       

      White is married to Adele McComas, the widow of Jim McComas, Virginia Tech's 13th president, who came from the University of Toledo to accept the position here. They met while White was on the board of visitors in 1988. When Jim McComas became ill, the family moved back to their native Ohio and White's wife, LaVerne, was very supportive during that time. She died shortly after Jim McComas did in 1994. Two years later, White issued a dinner invitation and in 2000 the pair were married. They have continued their connection to Virginia Tech since then.

       

       

       

    • 1989-91 Clifford A. “Cliff” Cutchins

      Clifford A. "Cliff" Cutchins III served on the board of visitors from 1965 to 1976 and again from 1987 to 1991 and was rector from 1989 to 1991.

       

      Cutchins grew up in Franklin in Southampton County, Va. He followed his father, Clifford A. Cutchins Jr., Class of 1915, to Virginia Tech. The younger Cutchins started out as a member of the Class of 1944, but those students had their studies interupted when they were called to serve in World War II. Cutchins served in the Pacific Theater as a captain in the U.S. Army, then returned to Virginia Tech to complete his degree in accounting in 1947.

       

      Cutchins' grandfather, C.A. Cutchins, ran a feed store in downtown Franklin, and his uncle, Cecil Vaughan, ran Vaughan & Co. Bank, which the family had established in 1886. After graduation, the younger Cutchins went to work as a teller in that bank, and over the next 13 years he worked his way up the ranks, becoming its president in 1960.

       

      Shortly afterward he negotiated a merger with two local banks to create Tidewater Bank and Trust Co. That bank then merged into Virginia National Bank, and by 1969 he had moved up to president. By 1980 he was elected chairman and chief executive officer of the holding company, Virginia National Bankshares Inc. Over the years, Cutchins engineered a number of acquisitions and mergers, and in 1983 Virginia National merged with First & Merchants Corp. to form Sovran. Cutchins became chairman and CEO of Sovran Financial Corporation in Virginia Beach, Va., a position he held until he retired in 1989 and was made an honorary director.

       

      In addition to banking, Cutchins also was a dairy farmer, operating on more than 600 acres in Franklin. He was one of the frontrunners in area dairy and hog farming, which netted him a posthumous induction into the Virginia Livestock Hall of Fame in 2011.

       

      Cutchins was also involved in other services to the state and community. He was a member of the board of trustees of the Virginia Retirement System, a trustee of the Science Museum of Virginia, a director of the Business Consortium for Arts Support, a director of The Norfolk Forum, a director of the National Maritime Center Foundation, a trustee of the Nature Conservancy, and served on the Virginia Business Higher Education Council. He was also a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award (he earned his Eagle Scout rank in 1937), which is granted to those who have a strong record of voluntary service to their community, among other things.

       

      In addition to serving two different terms on the board of visitors (1965 to 1976 and 1987 to 1991), including serving as rector from 1989 to 1991, Cutchins served on the board of the Virginia Tech Foundation and was an honorary member of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. He established the Clifford A. Cutchins Endowed Scholarship and the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Scholarship Endowment. He was a charter member of both the Ut Prosim Society and the President's Circle, which recognizes donors who have given more than $1 million to Virginia Tech.

       

      In recognition of his willingness to lend a hand, the university honored Cutchins a number of times over the years. In 1974, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award and in 1984 he received the University Distinguished Achievement Award. In 1995, he received the William H. Ruffner Medal, the university's highest award for service.

       

      Cutchins died Dec. 24, 2002, at age 79 in Virginia Beach. He was survived by his wife of 55 years, Ann Woods Cutchins; and three sons, Clifford Armstrong Cutchins IV and his wife, Jane, William Witherspoon Cutchins and his wife, Caroline, and Cecil Vaughan Cutchins and his wife, Anne. He was also survived by two sisters, Keith Cutchins DeMoss of Nashvile, Tenn. and Katherine Cutchins Billingham of Syracuse, New York; and eight grandchildren, Sarah Cutchins Ewing, Ann Woods Cutchins, William Witherspoon Cutchins, Caroline Davidson Cutchins, Elizabeth Matthews Cutchins, Cecil Vaughan Cutchins Jr., Allison Armstrong Cutchins and Clifford A. Cutchins V.

       

    • 1991-96 Clifton C. “Cliff” Garvin

      Clifton C. "Cliff" Garvin served on the board of visitors from 1988 to 1996 and was rector from 1991 to 1996.

       

      Garvin was a Portsmouth, Va., native who graduated with honors from Virginia Tech in 1943 with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. After three years of service with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the South Pacific, he returned to Blacksburg to earn a master's degree in chemical engineering in 1947.

       

      Garvin went to work as a process engineer in an oil refinery in Louisiana for the company now known as Exxon, eventually becoming refinery manager. Garvin also served in other jobs, including vice president of Humble (predecessor of Exxon USA) and executive assistant to the chairman of the board. He worked in Baton Rouge, Tulsa, Midland, Houston, Los Angeles, and New York as he worked his way up to president of the corporation in 1972; he was selected chairman and chief executive officer in 1975. He remained CEO of Exxon until 1986, when he retired.

       

      Garvin was also been a member and director of numerous national and international corporations including director of Georgia Pacific, Citicorp, Citibank, Johnson & Johnson, J.C. Penny Co. Inc., PepsiCo Inc., Sperry Corporation, TRW Inc., and the United Way of Tri-state. He has honorary doctorate degrees from New York University, Stevens Institute of Technology, and Georgetown University. He was the recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from Texas Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association and the C. Walter Nichols Award from New York University Graduate School of Business. The government of the Netherlands has also honored Garvin.

       

      Garvin also continually served Virginia Tech in a variety of ways. He served from 1988 to 1996 on the university's board of visitors, including five years as rector (from 1991 to 1996). He served as vice chairman of the Campaign for Excellence, Virginia Tech's first national fund-raising campaign; was chairman of the Virginia Tech Annual Fund; and was a member of the Corporate Development Council and Council of 100 in the College of Engineering. In addition, Garvin's generous endowments to the university have helped to establish two professorships, one in the arts and sciences and the other in engineering. He was a Virginia Tech Foundation board member and was a member of the Ut Prosim Society.

       

      To recognize his contributions to the university, Garvin was the first recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in 1983. He was presented the William H. Ruffner Medal, the university's highest honor, in 1997. He received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2001. In 2002, he received an honorary Doctor of Science degree. Garvin died on April 17, 2016. He was 94.

       

    • 1996-97 Henry J. Dekker

      Henry J. Dekker served on the board of visitors from 1989 to 1997 and was rector from 1996 to 1997.

       

      Dekker was born in 1920 in Norfolk, Va., to John Peter and Frieda Tiedemann Dekker. The family lived in Norfolk and Virginia Beach. He graduated from Oceana High School in 1937 and attended the Norfolk Division of William and Mary for one year. Dekker came to Virginia Tech in September 1940 as a member of the class of 1944, but like many other students of that time, his studies were interrupted by a call from the military.

       

      Dekker's three years of military service during World War II, from March 1943 until 1946, was as an officer in the U.S. Army in the 11th Airborne Division. He trained as a paratrooper and served in the Philippines, Okinawa, and Japan (occupation.)

       

      Dekker returned to Virginia Tech to graduate in June 1947 from the Pamplin College of Business with a degree in advanced accounting. While he was at Virginia Tech (before and after his military service), Dekker served in the Corps of Cadets from September 1940 until March 1943 (Army service) in the Accelerated Program of Year Round classes. He was elected president of the Class of 1944 for each of three years and was elected president of the Corps of Cadets in January 1943. He also served as vice president of the German Club (1942 to 1943) and president in 1946 and 1947. He was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa, the Leadership Society, and was active in student government.

       

      Dekker served as the university's treasurer for two years after graduation while he completed all the coursework for a master's degree. He left the treasurer's office and moved to Greensboro, N.C., where he joined Eugene C. Rowe, Class of 1933, vice president and treasurer of Burlington Industries, as an assistant in May 1951. He moved to New York with Burlington, then Deering Milliken, followed by Hoechst Fibers, and Texfi Industries. In 1979, he founded became president of the North American operations of French couturier Louis Feraud Inc. His sales career gave him considerable international experience in Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Hong Kong, and Japan. He retired as vice chairman of Louis Feraud in 1991.

       

      Dekker's passions were the German Club, the Corps of Cadets, the Pamplin College of Business, and Virginia Tech. He assisted Charles O. Gordon Sr., Class of 1942, in the Campaign for the Second Century of the German Club. He was one of the leaders of the of the campaign for the revitalization of the corps from 1992 to 2002. He served on the board of visitors from 1989 to 1997, and was rector from 1996 to 1997. He also served on the Advisory Committee of the university Center for Leadership Studies. He was a senior benefactor of the Ut Prosim Society, a member of the Legacy Society, and a member of the William Preston Society (former board member).

       

      Dekker was also generous to the university, establishing a $10 million scholarship endowment and leading the effort to create the Corps Center for Leader Development.

       

      The university recognized Dekker's service in a variety of ways. In 1987, he received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award. He was a recipient of the Pamplin College of Business Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1990. In 1999, Dekker was named the recipient of William Henry Ruffner Medal, the university's highest honor for dedicated and distinguished service. He also was the class ring collection namesake for the Class of 1998.

       

      The Dekkers moved back to Blacksburg, Va., from New York in 1980 but he continued to commute to New York for 11 years. Dekker was married to Louisa Kent Otey Hoge Gillet. They had three children, Louisa Kent, Alice Hoge, and Peyton Gillet. They had five grandchildren, Eric Richardson, Alex Richardson, Ashley Dekker, Henry Dekker III, and Peyton Dekker. Tragically, their eldest daughter, Louisa Kent, died on Feb. 27, 2007, and Dekker's wife of 57 years died May 3, 2007. Dekker died June 13, 2011, at the age of 90.

       

    • 1997-2002 James E. Turner Jr.

      James E. Turner Jr. served on the board of visitors from 1994 to 2002 and was rector from 1997 to 2002.

       

      Turner was born April 21, 1934, in Isle of Wight. He came to Virginia Tech and graduated in 1956 with a bachelor's degree in agricultural engineering. Upon graduation, Turner began his career in 1957 with the Newport News Shipbuilding Co. of the Tenneco Corp., where he spent 25 years advancing through several positions including design engineer, operations supervisor, superintendent, and manager of manufacturing.

       

      In 1975, Turner moved to Westinghouse Corp. as vice president and was named general manager in 1978. In 1981 he rejoined Newport News Shipbuilding as vice president until his departure in September 1988, at which time he went on to become corporate vice president and general manager of General Dynamics Corporation's Electric Boat Division, the company's nuclear submarine division. Turner was named executive vice president of the corporation in February 1991, with responsibility for marine, land systems, and services businesses. He became president of Electric Boat in April 1993, while concurrently serving as an executive vice president of the corporation.

       

      In 1995, Turner began leading the company's Marine Systems Group and in June 1997, he was elected president and chief operating officer of General Dynamics. He retired from that postion on Jan. 15, 2000.

       

      In his professional postion, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1998, which honored him for "leading the implementation of innovative engineering and design processes, and establishing a new standard for naval ship design and acquisition." Turner was the 1999 recipient of the Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz Award from the Navy League of the United States, which honors industry leaders who have made major contributions to U.S. maritime strength.

       

      Turner was active as a student at Virginia Tech, spending two years in the Corps of Cadets, playing football, and being a member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi honor fraternities. He continued to maintained a close relationship with his alma mater throughout the years, serving on the Academy of Engineering Excellence, the Virginia Tech Foundation board of directors, and the College of Engineering's Committee of 100. He is a member of the Ut Prosim Society and a charter member of the President's Circle. He served on the board of visitors (from 1994 to 2002) and was rector (from 1997 to 2002).

       

      In recognition of his contributions, the university in 1994 presented Turner with the University Distinguished Achievement Award. He received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2003 and the university's highest award, the William H. Ruffner Medal, in 2004.

       

      He and his wife, Elizabeth Nelms Turner, have two grown sons. They have homes in Connecticut, Reston, Va., and St. John's County, Fla.

       

    • 2002-04 John G. Rocovich

      John G. Rocovich served on the board of visitors from 1997 to 2005 and was appointed to a term to serve from 2010 through 2014 and was rector from 2002 to 2004.

       

      Rocovich was born in Roanoke, Va., on Jan. 19, 1945. He graduated from Blacksburg High School in 1963 and attended Virginia Tech, graduating cum laude from the College of Business in 1966. He attended law school at the University of Richmond and earned his juris doctorate and passed the Virginia bar in 1967. Rocovich then entered New York University, where he graduated with his Master of Law in taxation in 1968.

       

      Rocovich returned to Roanoke to establish the law firm Moss & Rocovich, where he practices taxation and trusts and estates law. He has been admitted to the bar in Virginia, District of Columbia, U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Tax Court, U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the 4th and 8th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

       

      Rocovich has also made Virginia Tech the central focus of his life, with much of his work in support of the university and often behind the scenes. In 1986, Rocovich orchestrated a $4.7 million gift for the benefit of Virginia Tech's Chemistry Department to create the Harvey W. Peters Research Center for the Study of Parkinson's Disease and Disorders of the Central Nervous System. Since its founding, the endowment, directed by Rocovich, has grown to $11.5 million, and the center has made strides in the understanding of the disease.

       

      In 1987, Rocovich arranged another gift to the university. This time, two departments in the College of Engineering were endowed, each with a $5 million gift. Each year, the growing return from the endowment funds several dozen undergraduate and graduate scholarships and fellowships in the Harry Lynde Bradley Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering and in the Charles E. Via Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The endowment also funds several other programs.

       

      The colleges of Engineering, Business, Natural Resources, and Arts and Sciences have each benefited from Rocovich's allegiance. So have the Corps of Cadets, the Athletic Association, and the 4-H Center. In recognition of his support, the John G. Rocovich Shooting Sports Complex at the W.E. Skelton 4-H Educational Conference Center was named for Rocovich. He served as member and president of the Virginia Tech Foundation, was president of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association, and on the board of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Alumni Foundation. He served on the board of visitors for one term, from 1997 to 2005, and as rector from 2002 to 2004, and is serving a second term that started in 2010.

       

      His interest and support extends beyond Virginia Tech to other areas of education and civic organizations. He founded the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg and is the Chairman of its board of directors. He also was a member of the board of trustees of Mary Baldwin College, a member of the board of visitors of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, a member of the Education Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, a member of the board of directors and treasurer of the Western Virginia Foundation for Arts and Sciences, member of the board of directors of the Art Museum of Western Virginia, a member of the board of trustees and chairman of the Virginia Museum of Natural History. He served as a member of the Governor's Commission on Champion Schools from 1994 to 1996, was a member of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education from 1998 to 2000, and a member of the Governor's Distance Learning Steering Committee from 1999 to 2000.

       

      To recognize his contributions to the university, Rocovich was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award in 2000.

       

    • 2004-06 Ben J. Davenport Jr.

      Ben J. Davenport Jr. served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2004 to 2006.

       

      Davenport is a native of Chatam, Va. He attended Hargrave Military Academy and Virginia Tech, graduating from from the Pamplin College of Business in 1964 with a bachelor of science degree in business.

       

      In 1941, his father, Ben J. Davenport Sr., founded Davenport Energy, a small oil jobbership. Davenport Jr. returned to Chatam to work for the company and helped grow it into a multifaceted company providing quality petroleum products to a customer base throughout southside Virginia and North Carolina. The company has seven regional offices serving more than 21,000 customers. Davenport is chairman of the firm.

       

      In 1969, First Piedmont Corporation, a full-service waste management company, was incorporated. The company provides waste hauling, disposal, and recycling services in Virginia and North Carolina, plus a special waste hauling division serves multiple states. Davenport is also chairman of that firm.

       

      In addition to his business interests, Davenport is involved in a variety of other activities. He is a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation. He sits on the board of American National Bank and Trust and of Boxley Materials. He serves on the boards of Hargrave Military Academy, the Danville Regional Foundation, and the Future of the Piedmont Foundation.

       

      Davenport has also been a strong supporter of Virginia Tech and of southside Virginia. He was a driving force behind efforts to revitalize the economy of southside Virginia, championing the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research in Danville, which was created in 2004 with Virginia Tech as an academic partner, and is a member of the board of the institute. He served on the Pamplin Advisory Council, the Virginia Tech Foundation Board, and the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Policy Advisory Board, and participated in the Hokies for Higher Education initiative. Through his exceptional generosity to Virginia Tech he was made a member of the Ut Prosim Society President's Circle.

       

      Davenport served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2004 to 2006, during one of the most challenging periods in the university's history — during the tragedy of April 16, 2007, and its aftermath.

       

    • 2006-08 Jacob A. Lutz III

      Jacob A. Lutz III served on the board of visitors from 2000 to 2008 and was rector from 2006 to 2008.

       

      Lutz attended Virginia Tech, graduating in 1978 with a bachelor's degree (with distinction) in finance from the Pamplin College of Business. He then went on to the College of William and Mary, where he graduated with a Juris Doctorate in 1981.

       

      Lutz went to work as an attorney for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in Washington, D.C., remaining there until 1984, when he moved to Atlanta as senior regional attorney for the FDIC. He became a partner with Troutman Sanders in 1990, serving in various capacities in his Richmond, Va., law firm. He at present is a managing partner and chairs the firm's Financial Institutions Practice Group, which represents national banks, state banks, thrifts, credit unions, securities firms, insurance companies, and related financial services providers domestically and internationally.

       

      In addition to serving on the board of visitors for two terms (from 2000 to 2008) and as rector (from 2006 top 2008), Lutz serves on the board of directors for the Virginia Tech Foundation (from 2006 to present) and served on its Executive Committee (from 2006 to 2008), was chair of the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Policy Advisory Board (from 2002 to 2006), and is a member of the Pamplin Advisory Council for the Pamplin School of Business (from 2006 to present). Lutz also has served his alma mater by participating in the Hokies for Higher Education initiative, as a member of the Hokie Club and the Caldwell Society, one of the university’s official donor recognition societies. He has generously supported the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, most notably providing funding to name the Jacob A. Lutz Greenhouse Teaching Complex in honor of his father's educational legacy.

       

       

       

    • 2008-10 John R. Lawson II

      John R. Lawson II served on the board of visitors from 2002 to 2010 and was rector from 2008 to 2010.

       

      Lawson is a 1975 graduate of Virginia Tech, from the College of Science with a bachelor's degree in geophysics. In 1958, William M. Jordan and Robert T. Lawson founded W. M. Jordan Company, Inc.; it is now the largest construction company based in Virginia. Lawson went to work for his father and is now the president and chief executive officer of the firm, which has its corporate headquarters in Newport News, and its regional office in Richmond.

       

      Lawson received the Ernst and Young Virginia Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2004, the Lenora Mathews Lifetime Achievement Award from the Volunteer Hampton Roads in 2003, and the United Way Volunteer of the Year Award in 1997. Lawson serves on numerous boards in his community, including those for TowneBank; the Fort Monroe Authority, for which he is vice chairman; Children's Health System, for which he is chairman; and the Mariners' Museum, for which he is chairman.

       

      Lawson has served two terms on the board of visitors (from 2002 to 2010) as a rector (from 2008 to 2010). He has supported numerous programs of the university, most notably providing funding for the the Myers-Lawson School of Construction, which was named in honor of him and his former fraternity brother, A. Ross Myers (who also shared in the funding). Lawson also served as co-chair of the National Campaign Steering Committee for the $1 Billion Campaign for Virginia Tech, which generated $1.11 billion in gifts or commitments to the university between July 2003 and June 2011. He is a member of the Ut Prosim Society President's Circle and a board member of the Myers-Lawson School of Construction. In 2012, he was presented with the Alumni Distinguished Service Award, which is presented each year at commencement to recognize individuals for their contributions to the university.

       

      He is married to the former Paige Zemany of Virginia Beach, and they have three children: Taylor, Tess and Jack.

       

    • 2010-12 George Nolen

      George Nolen has served on the board of visitors from 2005 to the present and has served as rector from 2010 to present.

       

      Nolen was raised in northern Virginia, attended Virginia Tech, and graduated in 1978 from the Pamlin College of Business with a degree in marketing. He went to work for Siemens in sales and moved up through the company over a 25-year period. He went from senior vice president of sales and services for Siemens Business Communication Systems Inc. In 1998, he was named president and CEO of Siemens Enterprise Networks LLC and then president and CEO of Siemens Information and Communication Networks Inc. (now Siemens Communications Inc.).

       

      In 2004, Nolen was named president and chief executive officer of Siemens Corporation, the U.S. subsidiary of Siemens, AG, a position he held until he retired in August 2009. After a brief retirement, Nolen became a member of the board of directors of InVivo Therapeutics Corporation, a medical device companyin Cambridge, Mass.

       

    • 2012-14 Michael J. Quillen

      Michael Quillen is an alumnus of Virginia Tech’s Class of 1971, having graduated with a master’s degree in civil engineering.  He is currently chairman of the board of Alpha Natural Resources in Abingdon, Va., where he formerly served as president and CEO.

       

      Prior to joining Alpha in 2002, Mr. Quillen served for four years as Executive Vice President for Operations of AMCI Metals and Coal International, Inc., where he was also responsible for AMCI’s Australian properties.  Mr. Quillen has more than 30 years of experience in the coal industry, beginning as an engineer and rising to the senior executive level.  He has held positions as vice president for operations of Pittston Coal Company, president of Pittston Coal Sales Corporation, vice president of AMVEST Corporation, vice president for operations of NERCO Coal Corporation, and president and CEO of Addington, Inc.  He currently serves on the board of Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.

       

    • 2014-16 Deborah L. Petrine

      Ms. Deborah Martin Petrine, of Hardy, earned her bachelor’s in business administration from the Virginia Tech in 1978. She is president and chief executive officer of CCR (Commonwealth Care of Roanoke Inc.), which owns and operates 12 long-term-care facilities in Virginia. Petrine founded the company in 2001, and also is a former president of Longleaf Senior Living LLC, which managed 32 assisted living facilities in North Carolina.  Petrine serves on the boards of directors for the Virginia Tech Foundation and the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. She is a member of the cabinet of the Pamplin Advisory Council and also is a member of the Roanoke Valley Hokie Club.  Petrine has served on the advisory board for the management department of Virginia Tech’s Pamplin College of Business. She also has served on the advisory board for the Virginia Tech Center for Gerontology. In 2005, Petrine received the Virginia Health Care Association’s James G. Dutton Award for lifetime achievement in the long-term-care field in the commonwealth. She received the Pamplin Distinguished Alumni Award in 2011.

    • 2016-current James L. “Jim” Chapman, IV

      Mr. James L. Chapman, IV, class of 1979, is a senior partner in the law firm of Crenshaw, Ware & Martin in Norfolk, Virginia. He attended law school at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Mr. Chapman’s legal career has been largely in the practice areas of admiralty, business, litigation and transportation law. He is listed in Best Lawyers in America and Virginia Super Lawyers, and has earned the AV® Preeminent™ Peer Review Rating by LexisNexis Martindal-Hubbell. He also teaches at Regent University School of Law as an adjunct professor. Mr. Chapman has been an active alumni supporter of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. He has served as a director and officer of diverse non-profit and professional organizations at the local, regional and national level, including Rotary, Navy League of the United States, Southeastern Admiralty Law Institute, Future of Hampton Roads, and Sorenson Institute for Political Leadership.

       

  • Members

    All members of the board of visitors are listed below through 2017 appointments,

    along with their years of service on the board. Special designations, if any, are noted as follows:

     

    *Ex-officio  |  **Rector

    Adams, Berkeley D., 1913-20

    Anderson, Joseph R., 1872-73

    Anzilotti, Michael, 2003-11

    Armstrong, E. J., 1876-79

    Bagley, Richard M., 1988-96

    Barbour, B. J., 1876-78

    Bari, Susan P., 1997-2001

    Barker, J. M., 1909-13*

    Barlow, Joseph H., 1992-95*

    Barton, Joseph M., 1889-95

    Bennett, James L., 198784-86*

    Beverley, J. H. C., 1904-05*

    Beverley, R. Carter, 1921-24

    Beverley, Robert, 1872-74

    Beverley, Robert, 1919-21

    Black, Harvey, 1872-76**

    Blewett, W. C. Jr., 1963-65

    Bliss, C. H., 1881-82

    Boatwright, Mrs. R. G., 1944-53

    Bocock, Thomas S., 1873-75

    Bolling, Mrs. A. Stuart Jr., 1967-71

    Bowman, Alpheus Michael, 1911-14

    Brinkley, Parke C., 1974-82**

    Broaddus, Andrew, 1881-85

    Broaddus, William G., 1987-95

    Brockenbrough, B. B., 1899-1903

    Brown, J. Thompson, 1889-1908; 1912-21**

    Brownell, James F., 1981-82*

    Bruce, Charles, 1880-81

    Bruce, David K. E., 1946-47

    Buchanan, John L., 1886-89*

    Burks, E. C., 1875-79

    Burruss, W. H., 1947-55

    Button, Charles W., 1877-80

    Byrd, Harry F., 1929-44

    Carr, Mitchell O., 1994-98; 2000-04

    Carrington, J. C., 1901-12**

    Carson, R. P., 1880-81**

    Carter, H. L., 1889-93

    Casto, Harold, 1970-74

    Chapman, James L., 2013-17

    Churchman, J. W., 1909*

    Clark, Charles Champ, 1987-90*

    Claytor, Mary Fred, 1953-61

    Claytor, Robert B., 1982-90

    Clement, G. Frank, 1971-79**

    Clisham, Gary, 1998-2002

    Cloyd, D. M., 1891-1905

    Cloyd, Joseph, 1872-73

    Cobb, Frederick J., 2008-12

    Cochran, Alexander B., 1873-76

    Cochran, George M., 1960-68

    Cochran, R. S., 1906

    Coles, Walter, 1875-78

    Cowan, John T., 1872-73

    Cowherd, Roderick, 1959-63*

    Craig, R. S., 1914-18

    Cranwell, William C., 1984-88

    Cutchins, Clifford A. III, 1965-76; 1987-91**

    Dalton, Beverley, 2004-12

    Davenport, Ben J. Jr., 2002-10**

    Davis, Westmoreland, 1942

    DeJarnette, D. C., 1872-76

    Dekker, Henry J., 1989-97**

    Delano, Robert B., 1994-98

    diZerega, Mary Howe, 1984-88

    Driskill, Buford L. Jr., 1990-94

    Duke, Michele “Shelly” L., 2005-13

    Dunford, C. Don, 1994

    Dye, Nancy V., 2012-16

    Eberwine, Vernon G., 1944-56**

    Edmonds, Thomas, 1878-82

    Eggleston, Joseph D. Jr., 1906-12*

    Eggleston, William, 1876-79**

    Erwin, William J., 1960-68

    Eskridge, Allen, 1924-52

    Etheridge, Bennie J., 1997-2001*

    Fahl, Douglas R., 2008-12

    Fairchild, William D., 2012-16

    Faircloth, John T. Jr., 1973-81*

    Farr, R. R., 1882-86*

    Faulk, Cordel L., 2012-15

    Ferguson, Homer L., 1930-38

    Ferguson, Meade, 1920-24

    Ferneyhough, J. G., 1928-30

    Finney, L. Stanford, 1937-42*

    Fishburn, J. P., 1948-54

    Fitzgerald, T. B., 1889-95

    Foster, William G. Jr., 1976-84

    Fralin, Horace G., 1992-93

    Fralin, W. Heywood, 1993-2000

    Fray, Mary C., 1977-85

    Freeman, Robert L. Jr., 2004-08

    Fulton, B. Keith (B.K.), 2012-16

    Furr, G. L., 1954-62**

    Garvin, Clifton C. Jr., 1988-96**

    Giacco, Alexander F., 1979-87**

    Gibbs, Mrs. Mavis M., 1963-71

    Gilmer, Vera, 1953-61

    Givens, J. Edwin, 1968-76

    Goode, John, 1872-75

    Goodykoontz, Robert O., 1968-76

    Gordon, Charles O., 1976-84**

    Graham, Jouette, 1961-64

    Graves, S. H., 1893-95

    Green, Duff, 1881-82

    Grey, Robert J. Jr., 1987-94

    Grimsley, D. A., 1880-81

    Hall, Sidney B., 1931-41*

    Hancock, John W. Jr., 1963-71

    Harris, Greta J., 2016-20

    Harris, Dr. William A., 1912-16

    Harrison, C. S., 1880-81

    Harrison, Edwin D., 1987-91

    Hart, Harris, 1918-30*

    Harvie, Lewis E., 1872*

    Hawes, Michael M., 1990-94

    Hering, E. A., 1893-97

    Hiemenz, Ginger L., 1991-92

    Hill, Charles T. (C.T.), 2015-19

    Hill, W. D., 1900-01

    Holland, L. Bruce, 2003-09*

    Holtzman, William B., 2010-14

    Horsley, J. R., 1928-44

    Houff, Betty, 1955-58

    Howard, D. J., 1949-57*

    Hubbard, E. W., 1881-85

    Huffman, Donald W., 1994-99

    Jamison, Calvin D. Sr., 2008-12

    Jenkins, Joseph R., 1994-99

    Jennings, W. Pat Sr., 1991-94

    Johnson, Adger S., 1964-73

    Johnson, Donald R., 1999-2003

    Johnson, L. E., 1908-12**

    Jones, Mary Virginia, 1984-88

    Kanakia, Hemant, 2003-06

    Kazmi, Mehmood S., 2015-19

    Keiley, A. M., 1880-81

    Kent, Robert C., 1875-76

    Kirkpatrick, Benjamin F., 1910-14

    Kizer, C. G., 1905-10

    Kline, L. D., 1908-12

    Kraft, Christopher C. Jr., 1970-78

    Lampe, Margaret Marston, 1988-92

    Lancaster, Dabney S., 1941-46*

    Landis, John W., 1966-70

    Lane, Helen, 1968-77

    Lane, E. H. 1956-66

    Latham, William C., 1985-89; 1999-2003

    Lawson, John R. II, 2002-10**

    Lawson, J. W., 1875-78

    Layman, T. Rodman, 1995-99; 2001-04

    Lee, Fitzhugh, 1878-81

    Lee, John C. IV, 2012-15

    Lee, W. H. F., 1873*; 1874-78; 1886-88

    Leftwich, J. B., 1880-81

    Lester, John C. Jr., 1969-71*

    Lester, Shirley, 1978-82

    Lewis, J. Marshall, 1922-30

    Lirette, Ginger, 1991-92

    Long, Thomas B. Jr., 1981-84*

    Lovell, John T., 1877-80

    Lowe, Sandra Stiner, 2003-11

    Lutz, Jacob A. III, 2000-08**

    Magruder, E. W., 1920-22

    Marston, Margaret S., 1988-92

    Massey, John E. 1890-98*

    Mathews, H. J., 1893-97

    Maxson, Cecil R. Jr., 1983-87; 1991-99

    Maynard, H. L., 1894-99

    McDowell, James, 1889

    McGinnis, Bernard L. Sr., 1984-88

    McKinney, P. W., 1883-87

    McMath, Albert J., 1921-23*

    Mellon, Paul, 1950-55

    Meredith, John A., 1878-81

    Miles, Waldo G., 1966-70

    Miller, G. Tyler, 1946-49*

    Miller, Michael G., 1998-2002

    Milnes, W. P., 1877-79

    Moffett, W. Stuart, 1930-36

    Moffett, William Stuart Jr., 1952-60

    Mohler, James B., 1990-92*

    Montague, E. E., 1918-20

    Moore, Rhea F. Jr., 1982-94

    Morrissette, Joseph F., 1982-90

    Moss, R. S., 1918-43**

    Mount, William D., 1914-18

    Musgrave, J. S., 1899-1903

    Mustard, W. G., 1883-87

    Nelson, Reginald H. IV, 1995-97*

    Nininger, Edgar D., 1944-54

    Noell, Robert J., 1908-12

    Nolen, George 2005-13**

    Obenshain, Suzanne S., 2010-14

    Ott, John, 1883-87

    Page, Rosewell, 1912-13

    Pafplin, Robert B., 1971-79

    Paschall, Davis Y., 1957-60*

    Payne, A. D., 1886-88

    Payne, F. M., 1891-95

    Pedigo, Linda J., 1979-83; 1996-2000

    Pendleton, W. C., 1881-82

    Penn, John E., 1873-75

    Petera, A. Ronald, 2001-05

    Petersen, L. Chris (Chris), 2016-20

    Petrine, Deborah Leigh Martin, 2012-19**

    Powers, W. Thomas, 1976-84

    Preston, Samuel D., 1952-60

    Price, T. B., 1895-99

    Quillen, Michael, 2010-18**

    Read, Charles C., 1938-47

    Read, G. M., 1955-62

    Rector, Charles W., 1979-84

    Reed, Charles Hancock, 1949-58

    Rice, F. E., 1880-81

    Rice, Millard B. Jr., 1971-73*

    Rice, W. Thomas, 1961-68**

    Robertson, Thomas L., 2002-06

    Robertson, Wyndham B., 1899-1908

    Robinson, Katherine, 1971-79

    Robinson, Rose Miles, 1988-96

    Robinson, Wayne H., 2014-18

    Rocovich, John G., 1997-2005; 2010-14**

    Rocovich, Sue Ellen B., 1989-97

    Rogers, Paul W. Jr., 2009-14*

    Ross, J. D. H., 1886-90

    Rowe, C. Eugene, 1968-76**

    Ruffner, William H., 1872-82*

    Russell, R. A., 1926-50

    Rust, Thomas D., 1996-2002

    Russell, Robert E., 1973-81

    Ryan, J. F., 1899-1903

    Ryan, J. Thomas, 2013-17

    St. Clair, Payton F., 1906-14

    Sanders, Paul D., 1955-63

    Sanghani, Mehul P., 2014-18

    Scruggs, Langhorne, 1880-81

    Selden, B. R., 1899-1901

    Severt, James W. Sr., 2003-11

    Sgro, Beverly, 1999-2003

    Shackleford, W. C., 1913-22

    Showalter, Jean, 1959-68

    Simmon, S. Dallas, 1982-83

    Slater, L. A., 1881-85

    Smith, Bruce B., 2002-03

    Smith, H. M. Jr., 1906-10; 1912-20

    Smith, James R., 2006-10

    Smith, J. P., 1874-77

    Smith, Mary Phlegar, 1944-53

    Smith, Oscar F. III, 1954-62

    Smith, Roy R., 1971-78

    Southall, James W., 1898-1906*

    Sproul, W. W., 1924-37*; 1937-41

    Staples, Waller R., 1886-88**

    Stearnes, R. C., 1913-18*

    Stuart, Harry, 1945-51

    Stuart, William A., 1872-74

    Sturgis, Steve, 2013-17*

    Sullins, David, 1877-80

    Sutherlin, William T., 1872-73

    Tait, Lee C., 1976-84**

    Taliaferro, W. B., 1876-79

    Taylor, James C., 1872*; 1881-86**

    Taylor, Noel C., 1996-98

    Terrell, Roxene, 1998-99

    Thomas, Joseph W., 1893-97

    Thompson, Philip S., 2000-08

    Thornhill, A. B., 1918-22

    Tidball, E. M., 1873-74

    Tilley, William J. Jr., 1982

    Treacy, Dennis H., 2012-16

    Tucker, James F., 1974-82

    Turnbull, N. S., 1886-91

    Turner, Joseph A., 1912-20

    Turner, James E. Jr., 1994-2002**

    Tyler, J. Hoge, 1887-90**

    Tyssowski, John, 1956-60

    Valeiras, Horacio A., 2014-18

    Vawter, Charles E., 1886-99**

    Veatch, Jeff E.,  2016-20

    Venable, A. R. Jr., 1888-93

    Wagner, Lori L., 2006-10

    Walker, Gilbert C., 1872*

    Walton, Mrs. H. H., 1944-55

    Wampler, Charles W., 1942-59*

    Wampler, Charles W. Jr., 1965-69*

    Wampler, Joseph W., 2001-2003*

    Wampler, William C., 1978-82

    Ward, G. Truman, 1984-87

    Watkins, J. B., 1903-08; 1912-28**

    Watts, Robert B., 1920-24

    Webb, L. W., 1942-52

    Wharton, Gabriel C., 1874-77**

    White, W. S. “Pete” Jr., 1981-89**

    Whitehurst, James L., 1970-74

    Wilhelm, Mrs. Jane G., 1961-68

    Wilkerson, Woodrow W., 1960-68*

    Will, Erwin H., 1958-66

    Willcox, Bolling, 1883-87

    Williams, J. H., 1881-83

    Williams, Wyatt A., 1962-70

    Wine, William E., 1943-54**

    Wood, T. Gilbert, 1922-30

    Woods, J. P., 1924-48**

    Woods, Micajah, 1911

    Wright, T. Judson, 1924-28

    Wyatt, Harry C., 1962-70**

    Yates, Charlie L., 1983-86; 1986-87

    Yates, Mrs. E. Floyd (Mary), 1955-63

     

  • Constituent Representatives

    All members of the board of visitors are listed below through 2017 appointments,

    along with their years of service on the board. Special designations, if any, are noted as follows:

     

     u=Undergraduate student  |  g=Graduate student   |   f=Faculty   |   s=Staff

    Abbas, Montasir M. (Monty), 2016-17 f

    Airey, Sarah, 2000-01 u

    Alford, Judy, 2007-08 s

    Bambach, Richard K., 1999-2000 f

    Banfield, Matthew, 2011-12 u

    Barker, Linsey M., 2008-09 g

    Beck, Tracey, 1986-87 u

    Bishop, Andrew, 1998-99 u

    Bradley, Allan, 2003-04 u

    Brickey, Jean, 2006-07 s

    Bunin, J. Christopher, 1996-97 g

    Callison, Myrna, 2003-04 g

    Cep, Melinda, 2004-05 u

    Cohen, Gabriel (Gabe), 2016-17 u

    Conn, David, 1988-89 f

    Cook III, Walter D. (Dan), 2014-16 s

    Dale, Todd Dwight, 1985-86 u

    Dalloul, Rami A., 2015-16 f

    De Wolf, David, 1993-94 f

    Disney, James, 2001-02 u

    Dotti, Sarah B., 1995-96 u

    Easterling, W. Samuel, 2004-05 f

    Ellerbrock, Mike, 2010-11 f

    Eng, Ludeman, 1990-91 f

    Eustis, Joanne D., 1988 f

    Francis, S. Ashley, 2014-15 g

    French, Rebecca, 2009-10 g

    Fuhrman, Ellsworth R., 1997-98 f

    George, Deepu, 2010-11 g

    Geyer, Leon, 1992 (spring); 1992-93; 2001-02 f

    Glatz, Leslie E., 1988-89 u

    Gordon-Bray, Arlane, 2008-09 u

    Goulson, Daniel T., 1984-85 u

     

    Hartman, Kristina, 2009-10 u

    Hausman, Bernice, 2014-15 f

    Heil, Katherine E., 1990-91 u

    Heimenz, Ginger, 1991-92 u

    Herndon, Michael, 1997-98 g

    Hillison, John, 1991 (fall) f

    Humphrey, Elaine, 1999-2000 g

    Irvine, Carol, 1987-88 u

    Jessie, Jennifer, 2005-06 u

    Johnston, Krista L., 1997-98 u

    Jones, Robyn, 2012-13 g

    Karpanty, Sarah, 2012-13 f

    Larrowe, Austin, 2014-15 u

    Leclaire, Kevin W., 1994-95 u

    Long, Gary, 2009-10 f

    Lucko, Gunnar, 2001-02 g

    Ly, Marcus C., 2004-05 g

    Lyons, Maxine, 2010-12 s

    Manjooran, Navin, 2005-06 g

    McCarty, Shane, 2010-11 u

    McCrery, Ennis, 2006-07 g

    McLeese, Michelle, 2011-12 g

    Merola, Joseph, 2013-14 f

    Metz, Paul, 1996-97 f

    Montgomery, Brian, 2002-03 u

    Morgan, Robert S., 1992-93 u

    Moser, Robert D., 1996-97 u

    Odendaal, Hardus, 2008-09 f

    Oduyoye, Darin O., 1999-2000 u

    Onopa, Nicholas, 2012-13 u

    Parrish, Alex, 2016-17 s

    Pencek, Bruce, 2011-12 f

    Redican, Kerry J., 1998-99; 2006-07; 2007-08 f

    Reel, Tara D.,  2016-17 g

    Rieser, Christian, 2002-03 g

    Rinehart, Susanna C., 2005-06 f

    Sagstetter, Gregory J., 2006-07 u

    Scanlon, Patrick, 1989-90 f

    Scheer, Stephanie, 2000-01 g

    Sewell, Edd Jr., 2002-03 f

    Seyam, Mohammed, 2015-16 g

    Shepard, Brennan, 2007- 08 g

    Sherman, Thomas M., 1995-96 f

    Shumsky, N. Larry, 1994-95 f

    Singleton, Alan C., 1989-90 u

    Smith, Ryan C., 2007-08 u

    Stroh, James E., 1983-84 u

    Sykes, Morgan, 2015-16 u

    Teel, Sue, 2012-14 s

    Thompson, Roxene M., 1998-99 g

    Trexler, Scott E., 1993-94 u

    Tucker, Thomas L., 2008-09 s

    Vernon, Mitzi R., 2000-01 f

    Waddill, Dan W., 1995-96 g

    Warrington, Nick, 2013-14 g

    Wood, Erica, 2013-14 u

    Zahm, Diane L., 2003-04 f